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Welcome Day 2018

When: Sunday, 28 January 2018 - Sunday, 28 January 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Library Lawns
Start time:9:00
Enquiries:

http://www.wits.ac.za/students/first-year-experience/

 

Wits University will be welcoming first years as well as new and returning students.

Meet the Vice-Chancellor and Principal, Professor Adam Habib, members of the Senior Executive Team, the Dean of Students, the Student Representative Council (SRC) and many other members of staff.

Parents and students will have an opportunity to engage with Witsies and explore the campus. 

First Session: Humanities and Engineering and the Built Environment @ 10:00 to 11:30 
Second Session: Science, Health Sciences and Commerce, Law and Management @ 13:00 – 14:30

More information: 

http://www.wits.ac.za/students/orientation-week-2018/ 

http://www.wits.ac.za/registration/new-first-year-students/ 

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Orientation Week 2018

When: Monday, 29 January 2018 - Monday, 29 January 2018
Where:
All campuses.
Start time:9:00
Enquiries:

http://www.wits.ac.za/students/orientation-week-2018/

 

Orientation week starts with Welcome Day on Sunday, 28 January 2018, and ends on 2 February 2018.

Click on your Faculty for the full Orientation Programme. Remember you and your parents are invited to attend Welcome Day on 29 January 2018.

Student Orientation features a variety of workshops and activities to address the needs of incoming students, including campus tours, meeting Deans, faculty representatives, staff from various support structures, a campus challenge, numerous campus resource seminars and many fun events.   

The aim of the Orientation programme is to ensure students will:

  • Become more familiar with the campus
  • Identify the resources available aiding in their academic success
  • Begin developing relationships with our dynamic faculty and staff
  • Foster student engagement
  • Prepare students to navigate their new academic environment

More information:

http://www.wits.ac.za/students/orientation-week-2018/

http://www.wits.ac.za/registration/new-first-year-students/

 

 

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OWeek Performance Arts Festival 2018

When: Monday, 29 January 2018 - Monday, 29 January 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Wits Theatre
Start time:9:56
Enquiries:

Bridget Van Oerle

Tel: +27 (11) 717 1376

Email: bridget.vanoerle@wits.ac.za 

Cost: R20

Wits Theatre and Wits School of Arts present the OWeek Performing Arts Festival 2018.

OWeek Performance Arts Festival 2018

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Power and energy in the context of the internet of things: the 4th Industrial Revolution

When: Wednesday, 24 January 2018 - Friday, 26 January 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Wits Science Stadium
Start time:9:00
Enquiries:

Willie.Cronje@wits.ac.za / 011 717-7224 or Ken.Nixon@wits.ac.za / 011 717-7220

The School of Electrical and Information Engineering will be hosting the 26th Southern African Universities Power and Engineering Conference (SAUPEC 2018).

This conference is hosted in conjunction with the South African Institute of Electrical Engineers (SAIEE). SAUPEC brings together academics and students in electrical engineering from the southern African region to present research papers, network and expand the fraternity that has been built as part of the SAUPEC legacy since the first conference in 1990.

 

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Evictions, citizenship and inequality in contemporary Delhi

When: Monday, 29 January 2018 - Monday, 29 January 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
RS248, Robert Sobukwe Block
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

David.Francis@wits.ac.za 

The Southern Centre for Inequality Studies (SCIS) will host Gautam Bhan to present this seminar.

Bhan is a researcher at the Indian Institute for Human Settlements in Bangalore, India. He is the co-editor of The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South (2018) and In the Public's Interest: Evictions, Citizenship and Inequality in Contemporary Delhi (2016). He works on urban poverty and inequality both as an academic and activist, particularly on issues of housing rights and evictions.

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Integrating theory and practice in neuropsychological rehabilitation

When: Monday, 29 January 2018 - Monday, 29 January 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Emthonjeni Centre Auditorium
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Sahba.Besharati@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Sahba.Besharati@wits.ac.za

The Psychology Department at Wits will host Professor Barbara Wilson, clinical neuropsychologist to present this brain matters lecture.

Practising neuropsychologists working in adult brain injury rehabilitation use a range of theoretical approaches in their clinical work. In 2002, Professor Barbara Wilson of the Oliver Zangwill Centre, Cambridge UK, published a model of rehabilitation arguing that rehabilitation is one of many fields needing a broad theoretical base incorporating frameworks, theories and models from many different areas. This presentation considers some of the theories and models, which have had the most influence on the field of neuropsychological rehabilitation.

Wilson is a clinical neuropsychologist who has worked in brain injury rehabilitation for 40 years. She has won many awards for her work including an OBE for services to rehabilitation in 1998 and four lifetime achievement awards.

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Section 25 unpacked: A legal analysis of the ANC's resolution on expropriation without compensation

When: Tuesday, 30 January 2018 - Tuesday, 30 January 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Seminar Room, Chalsty Teaching and Conference Centre, School of Law
Start time:17:30
Enquiries:

Asma.Ooni@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Asma.Ooni@wits.ac.za

The Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management will host a discussion on expropriation without compensation and what the law tells us.

Wits Property Law lecturers Professor Jackie Dugard and Nompumelelo Seme will join in the discussion which will be chaired by Head of School of Law, Professor Wesahl Domingo.

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More than scars and bruises? Assessing the impact of prenatal care on birth outcomes

When: Wednesday, 07 February 2018 - Wednesday, 07 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
CB 100, SEBS Seminar Suite, 1st Floor, New Commerce Building
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Siyabonga.Molaba@wits.ac.za 

The School of Economic and Business Sciences (SEBS) will host this seminar presentation by Dr Nyasha Mahonye from Wits.

Mahonye will examine whether physical violence during pregnancy impedes the beneficial effect of pre-natal care on child birth outcomes using comparable and nationally representative household-level data from the IPUMS-Demographic and Health Survey for selected countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The quality, quantity, and adequacy of prenatal care are all considered.

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Free webinar: Access to cancer medicines in South Africa

When: Tuesday, 30 January 2018 - Tuesday, 30 January 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Philip V Tobias Health Sciences Building, Faculty of Health Sciences, Wits University, 29 Princess of Wales Terrace, Parktown
Start time:11:00
Enquiries:

Lorenzo Raynard: lraynard@ska.ac.za

Cost: Free

Access to Cancer Medicines in South Africa: A live discussion and webinar

Kwanele Asante, Chair of the Ministerial Advisory Commission on the Prevention and Control of Cancer, will speak at this lecture, which takes place in the Senate Room at Wits University.

Other speakers include:

  • Malebona Previous Matsoso, Director General of the National Department of Health
  • Xolelwa Mlumbi Peter, Deputy Director General at the DTI to discuss intellectual property
  • Professor Paul Ruff, from the University of the Witwatersrand, representing medical oncology
  • James Love, international patent and access activist from the UK Union for Affordable Cancer Treatment, and
  • Sue Johnson, multiple myeloma survivor.

The lecture is available simultaneously as a webinar. To join Lorenzo Raynard (SKA) at ska-vc.tenet.ac.za, use any of the following options: 

NOTE: Any video, audio and/or materials viewed during this conference may be recorded. 

Need help getting started? Check out the Vidyo Knowledge Center at http://www.vidyo.com/knowledge-center/ 

and TENET's help pages at https://tenetvc.wordpress.com/users/ 

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Of ancestors, mining companies and invasive species

When: Tuesday, 06 February 2018 - Tuesday, 06 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
First Floor Seminar Room, John Moffat Building
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

njogu.morgan2@wits.ac.za 

Dr Emilie Guitard from the French Institute of Research in Africa in Nigeria will present this seminar.

Guitard studies the relationship between urban African societies and their environments.

The town of Hwange, located in Matabeleland North, North-Eastern Zimbabwe, has historical roots in coal mining. It is also located on the border of the country’s biggest protected area, the Hwange National Park. The 37 500 inhabitants of Hwange thus live in a paradoxical ecological context, caught between coal mines, mango trees, natural species introduced under British rule, and wildlife from the nearby Park.

This seminar presentation is based on the first analyses conducted on ethnographic and ethno-scientific data collected during a two months fieldwork in 2015, with city-dwellers and authorities of Hwange. The research reveals that the city-dwellers pay close attention to their natural environment and to the changes affecting it, through leisure activities (gardening, hunting, fishing), close relations maintained with their rural “homesteads”, but also through a great number of ecological phenomena imposed upon them such as water pollution.

Hwange inhabitants, along with local resource managers and municipal authorities, also produce diagnostics to explain these environmental changes. These diagnostics are built in complex causality chains, associating ecological causes with economic, political or religious causes. This specific case could serve to open a discussion on how to address urban governance and urbanity through relations to nature in urban settings.

 

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Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) seminar

When: Friday, 09 February 2018 - Friday, 09 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
CSMI Seminar Room, 3rd floor Chamber of Mines Building
Start time:14:00
Enquiries:

Pontsho.Ledwaba@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Pontsho.Ledwaba@wits.ac.za

The Centre for Sustainability in Mining and Industry (CSMI) will host Dylan McFarlane.

Mcfarlane is Senior Program Officer working for Pact, a non-profit international development organisation established to improve the lives of those who are marginalised and submerged in poverty across the world. 

The special seminar will start off with a presentation by Pontsho Ledwaba on ASM in South Africa. This presentation is based on a project funded by Open Society Foundation for South Africa. This will be followed by McFarlane’s presentation which has two parts. The first part will be an overview of the DELVE project – a World Bank funded project which is aimed at building an online database for ASM. The second part will reflect on the evolution of the placer gold industry of Alaska, USA. Collectively, the ~200 small operations are known as Alaska’s “sixth” large mine and produce around 90 000 ounces per year. Placer gold exploration and mining techniques have changed considerably over the years, and operators continue to innovate in order to target larger, lower grade deposits with more difficult mineral processing challenges.

 

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'University for all' in the Calais refugee camp and other contexts beyond university walls

When: Thursday, 01 February 2018 - Thursday, 01 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Jill.Bradbury@wits.ac.za

 

The Narrative Enquiry for Social Transformation and the School of Human and Community Development will host a public lecture by Professor Corinne Squire.

Squire is from the Centre for Narrative Research at the University of East London, UK. 

The lecture is based on a paper which explores the borders of education, recognising that teaching, learning and knowledge-making happens in socio-political and cultural fields whose contours are shaped by who educates whom, about what, and why. These issues are explored in relation to contemporary refugee issues in Europe, specifically addressing the informal ‘Jungle’ camp in Calais, northern France, where UEL students and staff taught an accredited Life Stories short course from 2015 to 2016, and other living contexts for refugees in France and the UK.  The paper suggests, first, that this pedagogy, apparently beyond the borders of the conventional university, is in some ways precisely the terrain of the university and education more generally. Secondly, the paper argues that on this terrain, ‘education’ can be seen to operate in a number of different directions for different stakeholders – refugees, teachers, other volunteers, associations, NGOs, and state agencies. Lastly, the paper disassembles ‘education’ itself, in contexts where it is represented and practised as an ethical humanitarian response, one of a set of international human rights within both global and local contexts of inequality.

The talk will be followed by a round table discussion and workshop from 14:00 to 16:00 in the same venue for masters and PhD students.

Professor Squire will be in conversation with Professor Jill Bradbury and Peace Kiguwa to explore issues such as: conceptualising and designing qualitative research projects, the researcher’s role, how and why we decide to study particular things rather than others, the relation between data collection and analytic methods, ethical considerations, the relation between research and other forms of action and knowledge-making. Students will have the opportunity to discuss their own research proposals.

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Drama for Life Theatre for Youth and Young Audiences Symposium

When: Tuesday, 06 February 2018 - Tuesday, 06 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
DFL Arts in Conversation Space, 21st Floor, University Corner [WAM], Corner Bertha and Jorissen Streets, Braamfontein, Johannesburg
Start time:9:00
Enquiries:

Caryn.Green@wits.ac.za

Professor Suzanne Osten, award winning director, will deliver a keynote address at the Drama for Life Theatre for Youth and Young Audiences Symposium.

The Embassy of Sweden in partnership with the University of the Witwatersrand Drama for Life, the Market Theatre Laboratory, and ASSITEJ South Africa, will be hosting distinguished guest, Professor Suzanne Osten, award winning director and playwright, and founder of Unga Klara Theatre Company. Professor Osten initiated Sweden’s first independent theatre company in the 60’s and has transformed the nature and status of children’s theatre in Sweden and beyond on issues pertaining to children’s rights, perspectives and politics.

During her visit, Professor Osten will deliver a keynote address at the Drama for Life Theatre for Youth and Young Audiences Symposium. The symposium will highlight practices and models in the field that endeavour to assist youth to find their voice, process the social challenges they face, learn about human rights and social justice discourse, and vision a new way forward. It will showcase work by the Drama for Life Theatre Company, which seeks to develop cutting-edge youth orientated performances about personal love, relationship and intimacy stories. Seminar and performance presentations will regard broader teaching, learning and research in the field, and engage delegates, in conversation with presenters, on the affordances of Applied Drama and Theatre approaches for youth development and social transformation.

Programme: Theatre for Youth and Young Audiences Symposium, 6 February 2018

 

DFL Arts in Conversation

Space

21st Floor

University Corner [WAM]

09:00 – 09:30

Registration and Tea

DFL  Emakhaya Theatre

19th Floor

University Corner [WAM]

09:30 – 09:40

Welcome and Opening: Drama for Life and the Embassy of Sweden Representative

09:40 – 10:00

Forward: Alison Green, ASSITEJ South Africa

Theatre for Children and Young People: A Global Perspective

10:00 – 10:20

Keynote Address: Suzanne Osten

Children’s Rights, Perspectives and Politics in Theatre.

10:20 – 10:40

Performance Presentation: Faith Busika

Indigenous Knowledge, Language and Culture in Traditional Storytelling: Ntsomi

DFL Arts in Conversation

10:40 – 11:00

Tea

DFL  Emakhaya Theatre

11:10 – 12:10

Performance: Drama for Life Theatre Company

Mainane

12:10 – 12:30

Presentation: Warren Nebe

Personal Story for Social Engagement and Transformation

DFL Yvonne Banning Studio

17th Floor

University Corner [WAM]

12:40 – 13:10

Presentation: Cherae Halley, Bongile Gorata Lecoge-Zulu and Jessica Lejowa

The Politic and Ethic of using Story for Activism

DFL Arts in Conversation

13:15 – 14:00

Lunch

DFL  Emakhaya Theatre

 

14:00 – 14:20

Presentation: Hamish Neill

The Role of Applied Drama and Theatre in Education

14:20 – 15:00

In Conversation: Tamara Guhrs, Clara Vaughan and Namatshego Khutsoane

Facilitated by Jacqlyne Titus and Response by Suzanne Osten

Making Theatre for and with Youth and Young Audiences on experiences from the Market Laboratory and the Inner City School Festival and Drama for Life Mvuso School and Community Education Project

DFL Arts in Conversation

15:00 – 15:15

Tea

DFL  Emakhaya Theatre

15:30 – 16:30

Performance: Drama for Life Theatre Company Interns

Insta-Grammar

16:30 – 16:45

Thank You and Closing: Drama for Life and the Embassy of Sweden Representative

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Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics Faculty Lecture

When: Wednesday, 07 February 2018 - Wednesday, 07 February 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Lecture Theatre 4, 5th Floor, Medical School
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za

The Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics will host its first 2018 Faculty Lecture to be presented by Professor David McQuoid-Mason.

McQuoid-Mason is from the Centre for Socio-Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

In this lecture, McQuoid-Mason will argue that public health officials and MECs for health who allow cancer patients to die because of a failure to renew service contracts for hospital oncology machines – without providing a viable alternative – may be found guilty of having the ‘eventual intention’ to cause such deaths and convicted of murder if the other elements of the crime are satisfied. Should the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) decline to prosecute them for murder they may still be prosecuted for culpable homicide. To succeed in such a prosecution the NPA would have to prove that reasonable public health officials in their position would have foreseen that a failure to renew service contracts for oncology machines at a hospital might deprive scores of cancer patients of early access to oncology services and result in their deaths. The lecture will end with an interactive discussion in which the audience will be invited to consider whether these principles could apply to the Life Esidimeni tragedy in Gauteng.

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Beads from Blombos to Barbie

When: Saturday, 10 February 2018 - Saturday, 10 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Origins Centre Museum
Start time:10:00
Enquiries:

bookings.origins@wits.ac.za /011 717-4700

Cost: Fee: R200 sold at Origins or through WebTickets: https://www.webtickets.co.za/event.aspx?itemid=1478

The Origins Centre Museum will host an illustrated talk on the Origins Beads by Severa Rech Cassarino.

This talk will present a light-hearted look at the story of beads from when it sprang up in the midst of the survivalist lifestyle of Early Hominids, through its various roles in ancient cultures - Sumerian, Phoenician, Etruscan, Egypt and Ancient Troy. The talk will be followed by a practical workshop where you will create your own personalised love version of the Trance Dancer.

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Justice, equity and health

When: Thursday, 15 March 2018 - Thursday, 15 March 2018
Where: Parktown Education Campus
School of Public Health Auditorium
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za by 8 March2018

The Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics will host the annual Ethics Alive Symposium themed Justice, Equity and Health.

The Gauteng Mental Health Marathon Project (also known as the Life Esidimeni tragedy) has highlighted the lack of access not only to clinical and technical resources for patients, but also to ethical practice and care. Equity considerations include the promise of our much anticipated National Health Insurance and whether or not progressive universalism will be a reality in light of the current context.

Speakers include:

  • Pravin Gordhan (former Minister of Finance and current Member of Parliament);
  • Professor Malegapuru Makgoba (leading South African immunologist, physician, public health advocate, academic, former Vice-Chancellor of the University of KwaZulu-Natal and first Health Ombudsman in the country); and
  • Professor Elmi Muller (Head of the Transplantation Service at Groote Schuur Hospital as well as the Head of General Surgery at the University of Cape Town).
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Taking streets seriously: the politics of public space in Johannesburg

When: Tuesday, 13 February 2018 - Tuesday, 13 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Seminar Room, First Floor, John Moffat Building
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

njogu.morgan2@wits.ac.za 

The next seminar in the Faces of the City series will be presented by Jesse Harber, Mamokete Matjomane, Alex Parker from the Gauteng City-Region Observatory.

This seminar is based on the research report Taking Streets Seriously which interrogates how what is considered good urban design and liveability of streets may shift in different contexts. The studies unearthed a complex interplay of actors on Gauteng streets, with street users, property owners and the state each operating according to their own, diverse agendas, contingent on the particular street in question. The result is streets that are chaotic, contested, and changing over time.

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A framework for mitigating externalities by their risk profiles

When: Thursday, 15 February 2018 - Thursday, 15 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
The Liberty Actuarial Auditorium, Room 112, 1st Floor, Mathematical Sciences Laboratory Building
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

Edith.Mkhabela@wits.ac.za / 011 717-6272

The School Of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences will host this seminar.

The seminar will be presented by R Lange and P Rumpelt. Since the concept of externalities was developed by Pigou in 1932, economists have committed themselves to analysing and trying to prevent the harmful external effects of economic activity on greater society. Despite this academic focus, the problem of externalities has not been completely solved. This point is most notably illustrated by the quandary of climate change, which threatens the continuation of the human species as a whole. This presentation will discuss why current methods for mitigating externalities are not succeeding and shows that a significant problem with the current methods is an improper approach to the handling of uncertainty.  A framework for categorising and mitigating externalities appropriately according to their risk nature will be presented. The application of this framework is exemplified through a case study involving the valuation of a nuclear power plant. This presentation will also suggest that externality regulation should be informed by the risk nature of externalities and demonstrates how this could happen.

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The reproduction of inequality in post-apartheid South Africa

When: Tuesday, 20 February 2018 - Tuesday, 20 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Social Sciences Seminar Room, RS248, Robert Sobukwe Block
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

david.francis@wits.ac.za 

The Southern Centre for Inequality Studies will host this seminar to be presented by Professor Emeritus Edward Webster and David Francis.

The seminar will examine the reproduction of inequality in South Africa, with a particular focus on power in the workplace. It will present a critical analysis of how the post-apartheid labour regime has addressed (and failed to address) inequality in the workplace.

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The pothole pandemic: South African exceptionalism, modernity and state failure for the middle class

When: Tuesday, 20 February 2018 - Tuesday, 20 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
First Floor Seminar Room, John Moffat Building
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

njogu.morgan2@wits.ac.za

 

Alli Applebaum, South African Research Chair in Spatial Analysis and City Planning at the University of the Witwatersrand will present this seminar.

South Africa’s belief in its own exceptionalism within the African continent has a long history, and South African (white) middle-class identity has been, at least partially, constructed in relation to Africa as the ‘Other’. A large part of the binary construct between South Africa and the rest of Africa, in the eyes of the South African middle class, is the ‘modern’ infrastructure that typifies South Africa’s cities, as opposed to the perceived rural and chaotic Africa. Middle-class concerns about flaws in the South African road surface are so great as to shape the governance strategies for local municipalities. A key argument of the paper is that the predominantly white middle class hysteria about potholes is driven by fear that the white diasporic modern vision for South Africa, inculcated under apartheid, is crumbling. Tracing the historical and contemporary discourse of potholes in South African media, this paper uses potholes as a lens to explore the relationship between the middle class and the state, as well as the way in which the South African middle class construct their identity; express anxiety, and understand their position in South Africa. 

This seminar will be presented as part of the Faces of the City series.

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Entanglements and aftermaths: Reflections on memory and political time

When: Thursday, 22 February 2018 - Saturday, 24 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
WiSER Seminar Room,6th Floor Richard Ward Building
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

 

 info.ictconsortium@berkeley.edu

 

The Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research (WiSER) will host this three day conference.

This conference will investigate connections between histories that persist into the present and reflect on the role of memory in our understanding of political time. Click here for the full programme.

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A lunchtime conversation with Shirley Zinn

When: Wednesday, 28 February 2018 - Wednesday, 28 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:13:15
Enquiries:

Cecilia.Smith@wits.ac.za

The Wits Transformation and Employment Equity Office will host Professor Shirley Zinn, CEO of Shirley Zinn Consulting.

She recently released her autobiography entitled Swimming Upstream: A Story of Grit and Determination to Succeed in which she shares insights into her life growing up on the Cape Flats, and the relentless pursuit of her goals in the face of significant challenges. The Transformation Office will be giving away 10 copies of Professor Zinn’s book.

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Visualising information with Power BI

When: Thursday, 22 February 2018 - Thursday, 22 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
The Liberty Actuarial Auditorium Room 112, 1st Floor, Mathematical Sciences Laboratory Building
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

Edith.Mkhabela@wits.ac.za / 011 717-6272

The School of Actuarial Sciences will host Alwyn Grobler from Lightstone Property to present this seminar.

We are presented with many tools today that allow us to link different data sources, manipulate data, visualise data and ultimately add some kind of value through this process. This talk takes a look at general concepts telling data stories through visualisation with the help of Microsoft Power BI.

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Drama for life town hall

When: Thursday, 22 February 2018 - Thursday, 22 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
eMakhaya Theatre, 19th Floor University Corner
Start time:12:15
Enquiries:

info.dfl@wits.ac.za

Drama for Life will host distinguished guest, Dr Phillip Speiser for a town hall presentation.

The presentation will explore the relationship between mental illness and substance abuse and the unique contributions that drama therapy can make towards treating and caring for individuals who are affected by these diseases.

Speiser is an expressive arts educator, therapist, drama music therapist, and “psychodramatist” who has developed and implemented integrated arts therapy and educational programs for over three decades. He is currently Director of Parkside Arts and Health Associates in Boston USA. Speiser has worked in the mental health and an addiction field for over three decades and has successfully integrated drama and arts therapies into mainstream treatment centers working closely with medical and mental health staff.

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The iron fist and the people: Two ways of analysing Africa’s paradoxes

When: Thursday, 22 February 2018 - Thursday, 22 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Seminar Room, Humanities Graduate Centre, Southwest Engineering
Start time:11:00
Enquiries:

 michael.elliott@wits.ac.za

The NRF/British Academy Chair in Political Theory will host a public lecture by Dr Paulo Faria, Universidade Agostinho Neto.

African states reflect complex past and present political trajectories. This can be understood as entailing four interconnected dynamics and processes: first, a mix of hasty decolonisation processes; second, the battleground of fierce proxy wars; third, ideological struggles for the balance of power; and fourth, the rule of perennial autocratic systems sustained by domestic, international, state and non-state actors. On the one hand, this has deterred the blossoming of civic rights and rule by law, and on the other hand, fed into narratives about the paradox of plenty, social imbalances, and institutional decay as undermining the struggle of African states to guarantee basic political, social and economic rights to citizens. Yet, despite enduring power structures that often interlace with repressive impulses within existing regimes, an emerging pattern of change seems to be taking place across the continent. It is hard, however, to foresee whether the efforts to reform the African Union will help to address the gulf between power-holders and the people or fall prey to a complex web of vested interests. This talk is based on a paper that attempts to tackle the challenges and opportunities facing the continent.

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Writing about city politics : The making of How to steal a city

When: Tuesday, 27 February 2018 - Tuesday, 27 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Dorothy Suskind Auditorium, John Moffat Building
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

njogu.morgan2@wits.ac.za

 

The next seminar in the Faces of the City series will be presented by Crispian Olver, Research Fellow at the Public Affairs Research Institute.

The seminar will be based on the book, How to steal a city, authored by Olver. The seminar will explore different ways or perspectives for analysing city dynamics, and discuss some of the thorny ethical issues that confront researchers, including the role of the researcher as an actor within the city space. The book paints a world in which both heroes and villains share human frailties, questionable motives and endearing characteristics, and moral boundaries are not as clearly delineated as the author initially expected.

 

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Resistance from within: Palestinian citizens of Israel and the struggle for democracy and equality

When: Tuesday, 27 February 2018 - Tuesday, 27 February 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Seminar Room, Humanities Graduate Centre, South West Engineering Building
Start time:18:30
Enquiries:

Ran.Greenstein@wits.ac.za

 

The Wits Sociology Department together with the Afro-Middle East Centre host this seminar by Ayman Odeh and Mustafa Abu-Raiya.

Odeh is Head of the Joint List – a coalition of Palestinian-Arab political parties in the Israeli parliament. Abu-Raiya is a pharmacist and water specialist, and is currently the Chief Operating Officer for the Galilee Water and Wastewater Union. Their visit to South Africa is significant as 2018 marks 70 years since the declaration of the state of Israel and the catastrophic activities it took to consolidate its territorial control. The tour will include private engagements, interviews and lectures in Johannesburg and Cape Town.

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The enigma machine: How legitimation code theory is helping achievement in education

When: Thursday, 01 March 2018 - Thursday, 01 March 2018
Where: Parktown Education Campus
Staff Room, Bohlahleng Block
Start time:13:15
Enquiries:

Lee.Rusznyak@wits.ac.za

 

The Wits School of Education hosts a lecture by Professor Karl Maton from the University of Sydney.

Maton is the Director of the Legitimation Code Theory (LCT) Centre for Knowledge-Building at the University of Sydney

Education brings together different knowledges and diverse students in a large number of possible combinations. Cracking the codes of success at any particular level, discipline, kind of assignment, etc. is a tough task for which some students are better prepared by their backgrounds than others. LCT reveals the organising principles of the diverse knowledge practices in which students must become adept to succeed. The lecture will demonstrate how teaching can use ideas from LCT to empower students by revealing the bases for achievement in different subject areas.

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African resource governance amidst political transitions and rising social resistance

When: Thursday, 01 March 2018 - Thursday, 01 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Classroom G, Research Hub, Wits School of Governance
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

kemantha.govender1@wits.ac.za

 

The Wits School of Governance (WSG) will host this talk.

Presentations will be made by Chris Rutledge (mining project officer with ActionAid South Africa); Makoma Lakalakala (a climate/energy project officer with Earthlife Africa) and Patrick Bond (Professor of Political Economy at the WSG).

In the wake of the African Mining Indaba, there is renewed confidence in the extractive industries, boosted by a 10% price rise since 2015's catastrophic crash. Several resource-rich countries in the region (South Africa, Zimbabwe and Angola) are changing political leadership from prior regimes considered highly corrupt. Yet these industries remain inadequately regulated, especially in terms of 'Resource Curse' complaints from civil society. As tough questions now arise about the net economic benefits of mining, in addition to many other grassroots and labour grievances, a rethink of the governance of mining is more urgent than ever. 

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Access to health care and organ donation

When: Monday, 12 March 2018 - Monday, 12 March 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Marie Curie Lecture Theatre
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za / 011 717-2190

The Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics will host this talk during the Ethics Alive Week.

Speakers include:

  • Professor Roy Thomas (Chief Executive, Kidney Wales Foundation) on Playing God in Organ Donation
  • Dr Shoyab Wadee (Nephrologist, Wits University and Donald Gordon Medical Centre) on Presumed Consent and Organ Shortage
  • Professor Magda Slabbert (Professor of Law, Department of Jurisprudence, University of South Africa) on Presumed Consent with Routine Referral
  • Professor Saraladevi Naicker (Chairperson - Ministerial Advisory Committee on Unrelated Organ Transplant) on Improving Kidney Transplant Rates in South Africa - Increasing Living Kidney Donation by Paired Exchanges and Donor Chains

                                          

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Social and labour plans: Alternative models for social benefit

When: Wednesday, 28 March 2018 - Wednesday, 28 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Chalsty Centre
Start time:17:30
Enquiries:

Robert.Krause@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Robert.Krause@wits.ac.za

The Centre for Applied Legal Studies hosts the launch of their third and final report in their Social and Labour Plan (SLP) Project.

The first two reports uncovered systemic problems in the existing SLP system that prevent it from achieving its objectives of transforming the mining sector and ensuring development for mine-affected communities. The report seeks to address these problems through proposing alternative and more community-driven models while also proposing immediate measures to improve the existing SLP system. The ongoing process of amending minerals policy and legislation coupled with challenges to the existing system by communities and workers mean that it is an opportune moment to discuss more people-centred alternatives.

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Dance Umbrella face to face conversations

When: Wednesday, 07 March 2018 - Wednesday, 14 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
eMakhaya Theatre, 19th Floor University Corner, corner of Bertha and Jorissen Streets in Braamfotein
Start time:12:00
Enquiries:

Winnie.Ansah@wits.ac.za or Mpho Kunene at 33concepts@gmail.com

The Dance Umbrella will host a series of Face to Face Conversations in partnership with Drama for Life

To book your place, please email Winnie.Ansah@wits.ac.za or Mpho Kunene at 33concepts@gmail.com.

The conversations are:

Dance and Culture: Conversation with Vincent Mantsoe and Gregory Maqoma facilitated by Warren Nebe

This conversation aims to explore the contradictory circumstances of arts and culture in South Africa through the concerns and criticisms of the dance industry; asking: How do we create more space, access and resources for the retention and sustainability of this important art form?

Date: 7 March 2018

Time:  12:00 – 13:30

Dance: Local and global: Conversation with Moya Michael and Steven Cohen facilitated by Nodumiso Msimanga: Dance: Local and global

Questioning the space for development and practice of the profession, both locally and abroad, this conversation considers the exodus of South African performers to places where their work appears better valued and more opportunities to grow and sustain their careers are afforded. It asks: What does this mean for the enhancement of the discipline from a local perspective?

Date: 9 March 2018

Time:  12:00 – 13:30

Dance as activism: Conversation with Gerard Bester and Alan Parker facilitated by Lireko Qhobela: Dance as activism

Looking at the increasing value being placed on site-specific, participatory performance and experiential, experimental and innovative work with communities and across disciplines; this conversation considers the benefits and challenges of developing dance in alternative spaces. Reflecting on existing and emerging performance art, it raises questions around the value of alternative approaches and spaces for dance in our context, asking: What opportunities do such methods of creative expression and artistic excellence offer for continued and sustainable development in the sector?

Date: 10 March 2018

Time:  12:00 – 13:30

Dance in contemporary society: Conversation with Robyn Orlin and Fana Tshabalala facilitated by Kwanele Thusi

This conversation explores new histories that are being shaped through the innovative integration of dance, multimedia, education, and community based performance. It asks whether the South African dance industry has fully recognised and considered the opportunity of interdisciplinary collaboration for the enhancement of perspectives and expressions of local and international issues of relevance in society.

Date: 12 March 2018

Time:  12:00 – 13:30

Dance industry and festivals: Conversation with Musa Hlatshwayo and Louise Coetzer facilitated by Dr Ricardo Peach

This conversation intends to reflect on and review the position, sustainability and future of performing arts festivals such as the Dance Umbrella, which has run annually for the past thirty years in South Africa. With the increasingly challenging economic climate, indiscriminate political agenda and the growth of a globalised culture, the lack of local support for festivals of this nature is increasingly concerning. Considering this reality, this conversation questions the significance and contribution of the festival to South Africa’s dance industry, society and national policy drivers; and the implication of current realities for the continued advancement of and investment in the dance industry.

Date: 14 March 2018

Time:  14:00 – 15:30

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Beyond a treasury view of the world

When: Tuesday, 13 March 2018 - Tuesday, 13 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Social Sciences Seminar Room, RS248, Robert Sobukwe Block
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

David.Francis@wits.ac.za   

Professor Vishnu Padayachee from the School of Economic and Business Sciences will present this seminar

This seminar, hosted by the Southern Centre for Inequality Studies at Wits is based on a paper which aims to set out some key alternative macroeconomic policy ideas for further debate and research in the context of the multi-disciplinary approach of the Wits Inequality Project. Padayachee will ask what kind of macroeconomic policy interventions will be essential for growth and employment generation and to a successful struggle against rising income and wealth inequality in South Africa, and elsewhere. His assertion is that unless we have a supportive macroeconomic framework, many other economic and social policy interventions for addressing growth and inequality will likely fail to gain much traction or purchase for budgetary and related reasons.

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The business demand on a modern statistician in the big data era

When: Thursday, 08 March 2018 - Thursday, 08 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Room 112, The Liberty Actuarial Auditorium Room, 1st floor, Mathematical Sciences Laboratory Building
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

Edith.Mkhabela@wits.ac.za / (011) 717- 6272

Philip Steyn from ABSA will present this Actuarial Sciences seminar.

Mathematical statistics and applied mathematics dominated industry, drive insights into various problem statements to enable business strategy and decision making across many sectors in the economy. Techniques associated with statistical sciences have been the go-to skill to enable complex problem solving.

Metrics derived using statistical techniques have specifically enabled the financial sector to perform risk measurement and to support sophisticated risk management. The advent of big data created hype around roles aligned to new domains that do not fully align to traditional sciences and techniques.

The data scientist role is often viewed as a modern role that is overtaking statistical science’s roles and is linked to buzzwords like deep learning, artificial intelligence and data mining. The velocity of data is increasing, systems and processes are more integrated than before, data quality is problematic and modern data management approaches are more agile than before. This talk will briefly introduce key concepts and definitions to discuss how modern statisticians should leverage new technology, approaches and capabilities to thrive in business.

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Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) seminar

When: Tuesday, 13 March 2018 - Tuesday, 13 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
CSMI, 3rd floor Chamber of Mines Building
Start time:15:00
Enquiries:

Pontsho.Ledwaba@wits.ac.za

The Centre for Sustainability in Mining and Industry (CSMI) and Action Aid South Africa will host Professor Gavin Hilson to present this seminar.

Hilson is the Chair of Sustainability in Business at the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom. He is the leading global authority on the environmental and social impacts of the artisanal and small-scale mining sector. He has published over 100 journal articles, book chapters and reports on the subject. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of the Extractive Industries and Society Journal. His presentation will provide ASM lessons and best practices from an international experience.

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If I Stay Right Here

When: Thursday, 15 March 2018 - Thursday, 15 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Origins Centre Museum
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

bookings.origins@wits.ac.za / 011 717-4700

Origins Centre in collaboration with the Wits Gender Equity Office host the launch of the book If I Stay Right Here by Chwayita Ngamlana.

The story follows the characters of a lesbian couple, Shay and Sip, who are very different in class, style, character and education. Shay is a journalism student working part time as an intern on a site that has no clear sense of direction. Sip is an unemployed varsity drop out and ex-gang member.

Their vastly different lives make it challenging for them to be the kind of couple they so desperately want to be. Unable to get untangled from the web they’ve created, Shay and Sip use money, other people and sex to fix things, but is this enough?

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Electricity and contagion: Two persistent metaphors for creolised dance and music

When: Wednesday, 14 March 2018 - Wednesday, 14 March 2018
Where: Off campus
CISA Committee Room, 36 Jorissen Street
Start time:14:00
Enquiries:

Lerato.Sekele2@wits.ac.za

The Centre for Indian Studies (CISA) will host a talk by Ananya Jahanara Kabir, Professor of English Literature at King’s College London.

In this talk, she will use a range of archival sources to probe this long-standing explication of the connection produced through creolised social dance as ‘electricity’, while comparing it to another, equally persistent metaphor for explicating that connection, ‘contagion’.

 

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A fruitful way forward for insurance

When: Thursday, 15 March 2018 - Thursday, 15 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
The Liberty Actuarial Auditorium Room 112, 1st Floor, Mathematical Sciences Laboratory Building
Start time:12:15
Enquiries:

Edith.Mkhabela@wits.ac.za  or 011 717-6272

Matthew Elan Smith, Co-founder of Pineapple will present this actuarial sciences seminar.

Born out of a global innovation competition, the Pineapple team are readying to launch their insurance offering which aims to completely overhaul the traditional insurance model. Their model revolves around transparency, technology and affinity to increase the value a policyholder yields from their short-term insurance purchase - a figure that is currently estimated at around R36 for each R100.

The founders of Pineapple have backgrounds in actuarial, software development, auditing and law. They will speak about entrepreneurship in the insurance space - touching on their journey, learning and challenges as an insurtech company in South Africa

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The climate crisis: South African and global democratic eco-socialist alternatives

When: Thursday, 15 March 2018 - Thursday, 15 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Seminar Room, Humanities Graduate Centre, Southwest Engineering Building
Start time:17:00
Enquiries:

info.witspress@wits.ac.za 

RSVP:

info.witspress@wits.ac.za  by 14 March 2018

Wits University Press will launch the book of Professor Vishwas Satgar’s book.

Titiled, The climate crisis: South African and global democratic eco-socialist alternative, this book reminds us that fossil fuel corporations, petro states and ruling elites are the key forces deepening the climate crisis. Only systemic change, led from below, holds out the hope for a safe and sturdy future. Discussants: Makoma Lekalakala, Zwelinzima Vavi and Ferrial Adam. 


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Cancer: A love story

When: Thursday, 15 March 2018 - Thursday, 15 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Wits Club
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Purvi.Purohit@wits.ac.za                

RSVP:

Purvi.Purohit@wits.ac.za                

Wits Alumni Relations hosts a discussion with alumna Lauren Segal, the author of Cancer: A Love Story.

Segal has survived four cancer diagnoses. She emerged from this terrifying journey having learnt more about the power of love and community, about courage and hope, and about writing as healing. Historian, researcher, author, film maker, museum curator – as well as wife, mother, daughter, friend –Segal has always been attentive to the stories and needs of other people. And even after her own ordeal, she still feels a calling to connect and to give, by sharing her experience.

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Supervision and the knowledge production process in universities

When: Friday, 16 March 2018 - Friday, 16 March 2018
Where: Parktown Education Campus
Staff Lounge, Bohlaleng Block,
Start time:14:15
Enquiries:

Matsie.Mabeta@wits.ac.za or 011 717-3416

Professor Felix Maringe will present this seminar during the Wits School of Education Research Weekend.

Postgraduate research supervision is at the heart of the knowledge production project of universities. However, significant weaknesses characterise the supervision enterprise. Based on research conducted in both African and European countries and on personal experience as both a supervisor and supervisee, the presentation explores the meanings of ‘doctorateness’, models of doctoral supervision, their strengths and weaknesses and ends with a range of strategic options for strengthening supervision at both institutional and national levels.

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Cycling cities: the Johannesburg experience

When: Tuesday, 20 March 2018 - Tuesday, 20 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
1st Floor Seminar Room, John Moffat Building
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

njogu.morgan2@wits.ac.za 

Njogu Morgan, post-doctoral researcher at the South African Research Chair in Spatial Analysis and City Planning will present this seminar.

This presentation bridges the gap in Johannesburg’s transportation history by providing an overview of everyday cycling in Johannesburg from the late 1880s, to 2016. It provides a trajectory of utility cycling in Johannesburg through five interrelated lenses drawn from the cycling literature and transitions studies. Using this framework, it shows that while oft-cited transport determinants such as urban form, land use and allocations in traffic policy can shed light on the story of the bicycle in Johannesburg, alone they provide limited insights. To complete the narrative, more attention is paid to the changing social appraisal of bicycles and cars, activities of social movements, and nature of other transport alternatives within the changing social, economic and political context of South Africa.

 

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Digital mining lab launch and seminar

When: Monday, 26 March 2018 - Tuesday, 27 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Sibanye-Stillwater Digital Mining Laboratory, Lower ground floor, Chamber of Mines Building
Start time:8:30
Enquiries:

Delchia.Jacobs@wits.ac.za

To celebrate the launch of the Sibanye-Stillwater Digital Mining Laboratory (DigiMine), the Wits Mining Institute will host a seminar showcasing DigiMine’s rese

Keynotes will be presented by two of DigiMine’s key partners: the National University of Sciences and Technology in Pakistan, and Sibanye-Stillwater who will give their view of mine digitisation in the 21st century. Postgraduate research students and partner organisations will also present. Register online

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Library week celebrations

When: Thursday, 22 March 2018 - Thursday, 22 March 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Conference Room, 4th Floor, Wartenweiler Library
Start time:12:15
Enquiries:

Thuli.Dhlamini@wits.ac.za

The Wits Library will celebrate the annual South African Library Week.

The Library and Information Association of South Africa (LIASA) is celebrating South African Library Week from 16  –23 March 2018 with the theme Libraries: heart of the Community.

Speakers include Leyla Tavernaro-Haidarian, a media professional and communication specialist and Nomoya Mahlangu, author of No Chains Around My Feet: Running as a Metaphor for Life.

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Practicum in teacher education: Images of the desired teacher in observation protocols

When: Thursday, 15 March 2018 - Thursday, 15 March 2018
Where: Parktown Education Campus
Staff Lounge, Bohlaleng Block
Start time:13:15
Enquiries:

Matsie.Mabeta@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Matsie.Mabeta@wits.ac.za

Lisa Österling, from Stockholm University will present this research seminar.

In this seminar, Österling presents an analysis of observation protocols from six universities insix countries: Sweden, South Africa, England, Rwanda, Singapore and Canada. The protocols convey a view of what is desired from teaching or from the teachers. The findings contain interesting and surprising similarities and differences.

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Making the future of journalism dialogues: We've been hacked

When: Wednesday, 04 April 2018 - Wednesday, 04 April 2018
Where: Off campus
Tshimologong Digital Innovation Precinct
Start time:17:00
Enquiries:

tshepo.tshabalala@wits.ac.za

The Journalism and Media Lab (JAMLAB) will host this panel discussion on the future of journalism.

The past 12 months have been extraordinary for the news industry, both in South Africa and the rest of the continent. In South Africa we saw the exposure of the 'Guptabots' and the leaking of the Gupta emails, the closure of the print edition of The Times, a new board and a strike at the SABC. Wits Journalism's State of the Newsroom Report for 2017 captures many of these events. The public role and the business of news and information organisations and professionals are being hacked. On one side there are Google and Facebook that are taking the majority of digital advertising and social media to increasingly dominate news distribution. On the other side is a growing and fluid range of factors - from commercial pseudo-news sites to highly organised AI supported campaigns - aiming to blur the lines between real and fake and in some cases to actively discredit and threaten journalists. The threat is clear - the undermining of the relationship between news organisations and their audiences.

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Darwin’s Hunch: Science, Race and the Search for Human Origins

When: Tuesday, 10 April 2018 - Tuesday, 10 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Origins Centre Museum
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

 

origins@wits.ac.za / 011717-4700

 

Cost: R65 (Adults), R35 (Students), R50 (Preferential)

Christa Kuljian, Research Associate at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research, will present this talk.

Scientific research is often shaped by the prevailing social and political context at the time. This is especially true for the search for human origins. Kuljian recounts the colonial practice in Europe, the US and South Africa of collecting human skeletons and cataloguing them into racial types, in the hope that they would provide clues to human evolution. She sheds light on how, during apartheid, the concept of racial classification mirrored the way in which many scientists thought about race and human evolution. In more recent years, the field has been shaped by a more open and diverse approach. Kuljian examines current developments in the search for human origins, and uncovers stories that shed new light on the past.

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The world’s premier emerging market marketing conference

When: Friday, 06 April 2018 - Saturday, 07 April 2018
Where: Parktown Management Campus
Wits Business School
Start time:8:30
Enquiries:

emcb2018.wbs@wits.ac.za

The Wits Business School hosts the prestigious annual conference.

Global thought leaders will present at this conference. Speakers include the leading marketing minds across the globe. Click here for the full line of speakers.  http://www.emcb2018.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Brief-Profile-on-Track-Chairs-International-and-local-faculty-Updated-1.pdf

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Democracy and its democratic institutions

When: Wednesday, 04 April 2018 - Wednesday, 04 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

Neo.Cindi@wits.ac.za 

The Golden Key Wits Chapter will host this Thinkers Symposium.

The symposium will focus on functionality of South Africa’s democracy. The country has in the last five years become increasingly knowledgeable on the various inner workings of democratic institutions such as parliament, the Office of the Public Protector and the Constitutional Court that has lifted the profile of these institutions and impacted the political landscape. The symposium will serve as a platform for dialogue on whether these institutions are doing enough to serve ordinary citizens. The Thinkers Symposium also seeks to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the South African democracy and hopes to encourage participants to further engage in conversations around democracy beyond the symposium.

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Special Screening: Vaya

When: Thursday, 05 April 2018 - Thursday, 05 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Apollonia Theatre, 2nd Floor, WSOA
Start time:17:30
Enquiries:

Pervaiz.Khan@wits.ac.za 

The Wits School of Arts (WSOA), Film and TV Division will host a special screening of the film, Vaya, directed by Akin Omotoso.

The film weaves three separate plots in a gripping, edgy and deeply moving story about coming to the city and the struggles to survive in the metropolis.  It is about strangers who never meet, until they share a moment when all their lives explode and change forever. A post screening discussion will be held with Omotoso and producer, Rethabile Mothobi, a former Wits student.

 

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Is South Africa’s property clause an obstacle or engine for socio-economic transformation?

When: Tuesday, 10 April 2018 - Tuesday, 10 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Social Sciences Seminar Room, RS248, Robert Sobukwe Block
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

David.Francis@wits.ac.za

Professor Jackie Dugard from the Wits School of Law will present this seminar hosted by the Southern Centre for Inequality Studies.

During 2017, politicians from an increasingly embattled African National Congress (ANC) government began publicly calling for radical economic transformation. Such calls, however politically cynical and undefined, occur against the devastating reality of widening and persistently racialised socio-economic inequality. Among underlying determinants of inequality, one of the issues that has dominated socio-political discourse in recent years has been unequal access to property and especially land. This gave rise to the ANC's resolution in December 2017, as well as the resolution in the National Assembly in February 2018, regarding the expropriation of land without compensation. At the heart of public discussion over land has been contestation over Section 25 of the Constitution, the ‘property clause’, which is widely perceived to be an obstacle to transformation. Section 25’s Janus-like character has given rise to a schizophrenic public discourse in which, at the same time as there are calls to scrap Section 25, many poor people and communities are appealing to the government to speed up private property titling processes, and property owners are voicing anxiety about their rights. It is against this backdrop, and particularly in the context of the Constitution’s transformative objective to ‘improve the quality of life of all citizens’ and advance the ‘achievement of equality’, that there is a need to examine the extent to which Section 25 is an obstacle or engine for socio-economic transformation in South Africa.

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Preserving dignity in later life

When: Wednesday, 11 April 2018 - Wednesday, 11 April 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Marie Curie Lecture Theatre, Medical School
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za  or (011) 717-2190

RSVP:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za  or (011) 717-2190

The Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics will host this lecture by Dr Nancy Jecker.

The value of respect for individual autonomy occupies a privileged place in the United States and many other Western nations. Yet autonomy’s significance may be waning as populations around the globe become increasingly geriatric, dependent and vulnerable to cognitive and physical impairments. A more central value in later life is respect for dignity. This presentation discusses how to preserve dignity in old age in the face of threats including social isolation, functional decline and overly aggressive and futile medical treatment.

 

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South African Theatre Season: Future roots: young, gifted and black

When: Wednesday, 11 April 2018 - Saturday, 14 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
eMakhaya Theatre, 19th Floor University Corner and the adjacent Wits Theatre at the corner of Jorissen and Bertha Streets
Start time:9:00
Enquiries:

Benjamin.Bell@wits.ac.za

Drama for Life presents the 2018 South African Theatre Season.

Themed Future Roots: Young, gifted and Black, the South African Theatre Season seeks to spark and grow the creative and entrepreneurial capacity of the young independent artists. The Season’s structural focus enforces not only the creation and offering of a platform for young independent artists to perform but also offers workshops and conversations aimed at stimulating and probing the creative economy through a youth centred approach.

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Economics in the real world: Reflections on three policy engagements

When: Monday, 16 April 2018 - Monday, 16 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2ndFloor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Enquiries: Rechelle.Tsunke@wits.ac.za / (011) 717-1193

Professor Imraan Valodia, Dean of the Faculty of Commerce, Law and Management will present his inaugural lecture.

In his inaugural lecture Valodia will reflect on the role of an economist in shaping policies aimed at reducing inequality. He will focus on three policy issues that have played some role in guiding ‘academic discussions’ to actual policy recommendations. These are the proposal for a National Minimum Wage in South Africa; the proposed amendments to the Competition Act; and finally, the proposal to increase the rate of VAT from 14% to 15%.

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The John Weston Memorial Lecture

When: Wednesday, 18 April 2018 - Wednesday, 18 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:18:30
Enquiries:

Portia.Marks@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Portia.Marks@wits.ac.za by 11 April 2018

The Aeronautical Society of South Africa presents the 2018 John Weston Memorial lecture by Professor Beric Skews.

This event honours John Weston, a South African aeronautical engineer, pioneering aviator, farmer and soldier. In 1911 Weston founded the Aeronautical Society of South Africa (AESSA). Skews founded the only aeronautical engineering degree course in South Africa within the School of Mechanical, Industrial and Aeronautical Engineering. He is also the founder/director of the Flow Research Unit.

 

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Book launch and discussion: GauTrained by Flow Wellington

When: Wednesday, 11 April 2018 - Wednesday, 11 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Wits Writing Centre, Ground Floor, Wartenweiler Library
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Karabo.Kgoleng@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Karabo.Kgoleng@wits.ac.za

Flow Wellington brings her anticipated collection, GauTrained to the Wits Writing Centre (WWC).

This book is a retrospective journey of life in Johannesburg, looking at the dreams we are sold to the harsh realities one faces in order to make it in the big city. Wellington moved to Johannesburg in 2011 and discovered that all that glitters are definitely not gold. In her poems and stories, she takes us deep into the underbelly of Joburg and shows us how Gauteng eventually trains you in so many ways. Join the WWC for a discussion on migration, abuse, poverty and rising above adversity.

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The discrete pulse transform in image analysis and spatial statistics

When: Thursday, 12 April 2018 - Thursday, 12 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
The Liberty Actuarial Auditorium Room 112, 1st Floor, Mathematical Sciences Laboratory Building
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

 

Edith.Mkhabela@wits.ac.za / (011) 717-6272

 

 

Dr Inger Fabris-Rotelli from the University of Pretoria will present this mathematical statistics seminar.

The LULU smoothers result in a decomposition of an image called the Discrete Pulse Transform. This decomposition is multi-scale and provides structure information of the image at every scale, useful information for various image processing applications. In this talk, Fabris-Rotelli will show two applications: one for smoothing of an image using the median and a texture modelling approach in spatial statistics.

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The integration of historical cartographic data into the GIS environment

When: Friday, 13 April 2018 - Friday, 13 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Origins Lecture Theatre, First Floor, Origins North Building
Start time:13:20
Enquiries:

karim.sadr@wits.ac.za 

Professor Scott Madry from the University of North Carolina will present this Geospatial Sciences seminar.

Historical data are becoming more widely seen as a source of valuable data for a wide variety of GIS analysis purposes and academic disciplines. This brief presentation will provide some lessons learned in several years of working with historical cartographic data in GIS. Several technical issues involving methods of georegistration will be addressed, including an improved method of registration developed by the author. Examples will be shown from several research projects, including our 30 year investigation in Burgundy, France.

 

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Book launch: The Specter of global China: politics, labour and foreign investment in Africa

When: Wednesday, 18 April 2018 - Wednesday, 18 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Room 248, Robert Sobukwe Block
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Gugulethu.Mabena@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Gugulethu.Mabena@wits.ac.za by 16 April 2018

SWOP, the Department Of Sociology and the Southern Centre for Inequality Studies will host the launch of a new book by Ching Kwan Lee.

China has recently emerged as one of Africa’s top business partners, aggressively pursuing its raw materials and establishing a mighty presence in the continent’s booming construction market. Among major foreign investors in Africa, China has stirred the most fear, hope, and controversy. For many, the specter of a Chinese neocolonial scramble is looming, while for others China is Africa’s best chance at economic renewal. Yet, global debates about China in Africa have been based more on rhetoric than on empirical evidence. Lee’s book is the first comparative ethnographic study that addresses the critical question: Is Chinese capital a different kind of capital?

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Book launch: Writing the ancestral river

When: Monday, 23 April 2018 - Monday, 23 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Seminar Room, Humanities Graduate Centre, South West Engineering Building
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Gugulethu.Mabena@wits.ac.za 

RSVP:

Gugulethu.Mabena@wits.ac.za  by 19 April 2018

The Society, Work and Development Institute and Wits University Press will host the launch of a book, Writing the ancestral river by Professor Jacklyn Cock.

This biography of a river shows how the ravages of the past are congealed in the present. The Kowie River runs through the center of what was known as ‘the Zuurveld’, the area between the Fish and Sundays rivers which was the crucible of settler colonialism.  During 100 years of conflict the amaXhosa were dispossessed of their land and livelihoods, defeated and absorbed into the settler economy as a source of cheap labour. Today this pattern continues as most of the African population of the area still do not own the land on which they live, and are denied the resources necessary for a dignified and productive life. The area of the Zuurveld, now called Ndlambe Municipality is one of the poorest parts of South Africa.

Discussant: Mazibuko Jara

 

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Principles of wiring of the human connectome

When: Tuesday, 24 April 2018 - Tuesday, 24 April 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Adler Museum
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Tanya.Calvey@wits.ac.za 

Professor Martijn van den Heuvel from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam will present this talk

Using network science as a general framework to study the network architecture of nervous system connectivity, more and more studies have highlighted that human and animal brains display features of an efficient communication network. In this talk, Van den Heuvel will discuss potential general principles of wiring of connectome organisation. These principles are conserved across species and are argued to play a fundamental role in nervous system functioning. He will highlight findings that show that connectomes display an efficient communication structure with pronounced community organisation for specialised processing, together with global short communication relays and a central 'rich club core’. He will also discuss the evolutionary importance of the connectome, how the macroscale connectome may be related to the microanatomy of the brain, and how general themes of wiring may play a role in the aetiology of a wide range of psychiatric disorders.

 

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Cities for human development: a capability perspective to city-making

When: Tuesday, 17 April 2018 - Tuesday, 17 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Dorothy Susskind Auditorium (A1), John Moffat Building
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

njogu.morgan2@wits.ac.za 

Dr Alexandre Apsan Frediani, Senior Lecturer, University College London, will present this Faces of the City seminar.

This presentation discusses the book project titled: Cities for Human Development: A capability perspective to city-making. The book intends to establish links between literature on human development and capability approach with critical urban theory debates, exploring the interface between justice and urban development. An analytical framework drawing on Amartya Sen’s work is proposed in its introduction, and then each element of the framework is examined in the following chapters through the use of eight different case studies. The book focuses on civic-led practices of city-making, and explores their role in expanding the capabilities of marginalised urban dwellers. This seminar will introduce the book's objectives and structure, with a focus on the tensions and challenges the author is facing in addressing the book’s proposed objectives.


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Holding apartheid’s banks to account

When: Thursday, 19 April 2018 - Thursday, 19 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
CALS, First Floor, DJ du Plessis Building
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

Leeanne.Bruce@wits.ac.za 

RSVP:

Leeanne.Bruce@wits.ac.za by 17 April 2018

The Centre for Applied Legal Studies (CALS) will host this panel discussion.

New evidence shows that two European banks were at the centre of the apartheid era international arms money laundering machinery. For nearly two decades, Belgium’s Kredietbank and its subsidiary in Luxembourg were responsible for facilitating up to 70% of all illegal arms transactions that allowed the apartheid government to secretly buy weapons despite mandatory UN arms sanctions. These and other banks have never been held accountable for their role in supporting apartheid. In the face of this widespread impunity, is there any way to hold these financial giants to account? Open Secrets, in partnership with CALS, is taking the fight for accountability for historic economic crimes to the banks’ doorstep in Europe using international accountability frameworks. Speakers include Michael Marchant (Investigations and Advocacy Researcher at Open Secrets); Khuraisha Patel (Legal Researcher at Open Secrets) and Wandisa Phama (Head of Business and Human Rights at CALS)

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Class, xenophobia and xenophilia: Migrant experience in Jo’burg’s diverse Cultural Time Zones

When: Wednesday, 18 April 2018 - Wednesday, 18 April 2018
Where: Off campus
Centre for Indian Studies in Africa, Committee Room, 36 Jorissen Street , Braamfontein
Start time:14:00
Enquiries:

Info.cityinstitute@wits.ac.za

The Wits City Institute ( WCI)and the Centre for Indian Studies in Africa (CISA) hosts this honorary research fellow seminar by Melissa Myambo.

In 2008 and 2015, South Africa’s most deadly and violent xenophobic attacks erupted. Dozens of people were killed and thousands displaced. The dominant storyline in the media and the academy cast the figure of the migrant as the perpetual victim of xenophobia.  There was not enough emphasis on nuancing that statement to indicate that it is not all migrants who run the risk of deadly xenophobia even if xenophobia is pervasive at all levels of South African society.  Deadly attacks only took place in specific microspaces, or Cultural Time Zones (CTZs).  Those living in the CTZ of the informal settlement were most vulnerable. Few migrants who live and work in economically privileged CTZs like the suburbs became victims of violence. In this seminar, Myambo will attempy to examine the relationship between (micro)space and migrant experience. Through an analysis of Jo’burg as a cluster of radically different CTZs where language, skin colour, race/ethnicity, education, socio-economic class etc. function in different ways to impact the migrant experience, Myambo will try to uncover the nuanced reasons why working-class migrants who work and live in socio-economically deprived CTZs may experience intense xenophobia whilst middle-class professionals, especially those from Western countries, often enjoy high levels of xenophilia.

Myambo is an Honorary Research Fellow at WCI and Visiting Researcher at CIS

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Never Modern: High-rise Housing and Race in 1950s Johannesburg

When: Friday, 20 April 2018 - Friday, 20 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Anthropology Museum, Robert Sobukwe Block, Ground Floor
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Info.cityinstitute@wits.ac.za

The Wits City Institute will host this seminar by Jonathan Cane, postdoctoral fellow at the Institute.

This seminar is based on a draft chapter which intends to account for the unique rejection of high-rise housing solutions for poor black urbanites in South Africa in the mid-twentieth century. What was then called the ‘native housing problem’ was dealt with by extensive CIAM-type research into low-rise detached bungalows which resulted in the infamous 1951 design template that has proliferated across the country until this day. Whereas, internationally the mid-century high-rise block came to stand as low-income housing, including in other parts of southern Africa (Southern Rhodesia, for instance), in South African the ‘match-box’ house or NE51 continues to both over-determine ways of building and has lead to low-density low-rise planning and continued urban segregation. The chapter aims to (a) account for this historical anomaly and to place South Africa apartheid-era planning in world-historical context and to respond to histories of high-rise low-income planning internationally; and (b) to extend the discourse of verticality and to provide Southern postcolonial contributions to the debate.

Respondent: Margot Rubin

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The future of the connected human

When: Thursday, 10 May 2018 - Thursday, 10 May 2018
Where: Parktown Management Campus
Donald Gordon Auditorium
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Purvi Purohit 011 717 1093

 

RSVP:

yumna.patel@wits.ac.za

 

Artificial intelligence, robotics, biotech: how will humans adapt to a fast-changing world in which we are more connected through technology?

Join your fellow Wits alumni for a panel discussion with Adam Pantanowitz, Dr Benjamin Rosman, Vimbai Carole Muzofa, Sunil Geness and Arthur Goldstuck.

For more about Wits and the Fourth Industrial Revolution, click here.

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Book launch: Media, Geopolitics and Power - A View from the Global South

When: Wednesday, 25 April 2018 - Wednesday, 25 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Wits Anthropology Museum, Robert Sobukwe Block
Start time:17:30
Enquiries:

Katlego.Disemelo@wits.ac.za

Professor Herman Wasserman's new book about South Africa's new media presence against the backdrop of rapidly changing geopolitics will be launched.

The Department of Media Studies at Wits and UCT Press will the launch the book: Media, Geopolitics and Power – a view from the global South by Professor Herman Wasserman (UCT). Wasserman will be in conversation with Thabo Leshilo.

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Arts in Conversation Series: Arts, mental health and human rights

When: Thursday, 03 May 2018 - Thursday, 03 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
eMakhaya Theatre, 19th Floor, University Corner
Start time:12:15
Enquiries:

Caryn.Green@wits.ac.za

The life Esidimeni Case and the role of the media.

Drama for Life presents the Arts in Conversation Series.

A conversation with Suzanne Venter facilitated by Leane Meiring. Venter is a senior investigative journalist at Rapport and winner of the prestigious Taco Kuiper prize for investigative journalism. Her work in the weekly Sunday newspaper inevitably resulted in an official inquiry by the health ombudsman and pushed the plight of psychiatric patients onto the national agenda after being severely neglected by the government.

About the Drama for Life Arts in Conversation Series

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines mental health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community” (WHO, 2014). This definition of health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity” highlights the intersectional relationship between mental health and human rights (WHO, 2014). It stresses the need to further investigate the connection in the academic sphere, to actively promote national debate around the fact that a serious neglect of mental health is present despite the protective policies and legislative frameworks offered by our constitution and the Mental Health Care Act of 2002.

With at least 141 psychiatric patients dead after being moved from the Life Esidimeni (meaning place of dignity) facility to various NGOs in Gauteng, it is clear that as South Africans we are witnessing a humanitarian crisis brought on by serious human rights violations of vulnerable groups living with psychosocial disabilities. This human tragedy has been called ‘the greatest human rights violation committed by the state since the dawn of our democracy’. In order for the healing processes to take root, deepen and become transformative, our social relationships, systems and structures have to change” (Nebe, 2016: 3-4). Our psychosocial condition is one of dislocation, which regardless of race or class, comes out of a socially constructed reality, based on the betrayal of the human spirit…In order for us to bring about a genuine healing in South Africa, we have to re-think our professions in terms of mental healthcare (Vetten, 2005). Through these conversations “Drama for Life aims to bring down the imagined binary walls that exist between the personal and the political, the psychological and the sociological” (Nebe, 2016: 5).

 

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Arts in Conversation Series: Arts, mental health and human rights

When: Thursday, 10 May 2018 - Thursday, 10 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
eMakhaya Theatre, 19th Floor, University Corner
Start time:12:15
Enquiries:

Caryn.Green@wits.ac.za

The psychological impact of the Life Esidimeni human rights violation and the role of expressive arts therapies.

Drama for Life presents the Arts in Conversation Series.

A conversation with Coralie Trotter facilitated by Warren Nebe. This conversation looks at the socio-political influences at the points of intersection between mental health and human rights, and the psychological impact of such human rights violations.

About the Drama for Life Arts in Conversation Series

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines mental health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community” (WHO, 2014). This definition of health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity” highlights the intersectional relationship between mental health and human rights (WHO, 2014). It stresses the need to further investigate the connection in the academic sphere, to actively promote national debate around the fact that a serious neglect of mental health is present despite the protective policies and legislative frameworks offered by our constitution and the Mental Health Care Act of 2002.

With at least 141 psychiatric patients dead after being moved from the Life Esidimeni (meaning place of dignity) facility to various NGOs in Gauteng, it is clear that as South Africans we are witnessing a humanitarian crisis brought on by serious human rights violations of vulnerable groups living with psychosocial disabilities. This human tragedy has been called ‘the greatest human rights violation committed by the state since the dawn of our democracy’. In order for the healing processes to take root, deepen and become transformative, our social relationships, systems and structures have to change” (Nebe, 2016: 3-4). Our psychosocial condition is one of dislocation, which regardless of race or class, comes out of a socially constructed reality, based on the betrayal of the human spirit…In order for us to bring about a genuine healing in South Africa, we have to re-think our professions in terms of mental healthcare (Vetten, 2005). Through these conversations “Drama for Life aims to bring down the imagined binary walls that exist between the personal and the political, the psychological and the sociological” (Nebe, 2016: 5).

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Arts in Conversation Series: Arts, mental health and human rights

When: Thursday, 17 May 2018 - Thursday, 17 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
eMakhaya Theatre, 19th Floor, University Corner
Start time:12:15
Enquiries:

Caryn.Green@wits.ac.za

Mental health, human rights and the role of the arts - a conversation with Gregory Maqoma.

Drama for Life presents the Arts in Conversation Series.

A conversation with the internationally acclaimed Gregory Maqoma facilitated by Refiloe Lepere. This conversation engages these artists, human rights activists and academics on their creative iterations and approaches to address mental health and human rights issues.

About the Drama for Life Arts in Conversation Series

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines mental health as “a state of well-being in which every individual realizes his or her own potential, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to her or his community” (WHO, 2014). This definition of health as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity” highlights the intersectional relationship between mental health and human rights (WHO, 2014). It stresses the need to further investigate the connection in the academic sphere, to actively promote national debate around the fact that a serious neglect of mental health is present despite the protective policies and legislative frameworks offered by our constitution and the Mental Health Care Act of 2002.

With at least 141 psychiatric patients dead after being moved from the Life Esidimeni (meaning place of dignity) facility to various NGOs in Gauteng, it is clear that as South Africans we are witnessing a humanitarian crisis brought on by serious human rights violations of vulnerable groups living with psychosocial disabilities. This human tragedy has been called ‘the greatest human rights violation committed by the state since the dawn of our democracy’. In order for the healing processes to take root, deepen and become transformative, our social relationships, systems and structures have to change” (Nebe, 2016: 3-4). Our psychosocial condition is one of dislocation, which regardless of race or class, comes out of a socially constructed reality, based on the betrayal of the human spirit…In order for us to bring about a genuine healing in South Africa, we have to re-think our professions in terms of mental healthcare (Vetten, 2005). Through these conversations “Drama for Life aims to bring down the imagined binary walls that exist between the personal and the political, the psychological and the sociological” (Nebe, 2016: 5).

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Book launch: Albinism in Africa

When: Thursday, 10 May 2018 - Thursday, 10 May 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Adler Museum
Start time:17:00
Enquiries:

RSVP: Mirriam.Hlongwane@nhls.ac.za by 2 May 2018

This new book provides the first in-depth reference for understanding and treating patients of human albinism in Africa.

The Division of Human Genetics, the National Health Laboratory Service and School of Pathology and the Adler Museum invite you to the launch of Albinism in Africa: Historical, Geographic, Medical, Genetic, and Psychosocial Aspects edited by Professors Jennifer Kromberg and Prashiela Manga.

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Archaeology Activity Day

When: Saturday, 28 April 2018 - Saturday, 28 April 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Origins Centre Museum
Start time:10:00
Enquiries:

bookings.origins@wits.ac.za / Tammy.Reynard@wits.ac.za / 011 717-4700

The Origins Centre hosts its Archaeology Activity Day for all interested in archaeology and our origins.

Spend time excavating with an archaeologist. Learn how the oldest paint was made, try your hand at some ‘ancient art’ or dabble in palaeontology with dinosaur bone puzzles. Stand a chance to win spot prizes.

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Math by design: 3D printing for the working mathematician

When: Tuesday, 08 May 2018 - Tuesday, 08 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
CoE-MaSS Seminar Room, 1st floor, TWK Mathematical Sciences Building
Start time:15:00
Enquiries:

https://www.wits.ac.za/coe-mass/

Three DST-NRF Centres of Excellence at Wits jointly present this lecture by Professor Laura “mathgrrl” Taalman, US mathematician, blogger, designer/maker.

The CoE-MaSS, CoE-Palaeosciences and CoE-Strong Materials at Wits will host Taalman, known as [mathgrrl] on Thingiverse, who is simultaneously a prolific maker and a Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at James Madison University.

She is also the founder of JMU 3SPACE, the first general-education 3D-printing classroom in the US, founder of the JMU MakerLab in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and a Faculty Associate with JMU Innovation Services, through which she creates and implements curriculum around 3D-printing and design.

As a self-professed “math geek,” Taalman’s 3D-printing projects are inspired and informed by mathematics. Her original makes include a 3D-printed snowflake generator that automatically designs unique snowflake models for 3D-printing, a pentagonal tessellation 3D-printed bracelet, and a 3D-printed “impossible screw” which could not be fabricated using anything but 3D-printing.

See also Biosketch and Math Encounters

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Launch: Open Access Data Centre

When: Tuesday, 08 May 2018 - Tuesday, 08 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:10:30
Enquiries:

Veshnee.Reddy@wits.ac.za

A seminar marking the establishment of an Open Access Data Centre for democracy research and the development of empirical social sciences in South Africa.

The Centre is located in the Transformation Research Unit (TRU) in the Department of Political Science, Stellenbosch University; and is sponsored by the Research and Innovation Support and Advancement (RISA) and the National Research Foundation (NRF).

Programme

Welcome:  Prof. Z. Vilakazi: Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Postgraduate Affairs)          

Introductions:  Prof. U. van Beek: Director TRU

Presenters:

Prof. Hans-Dieter Klingemann, former Director Social Science Centre Berlin (WZB); President: University of Applied Sciences BAU International, Berlin

Title of presentation: Studying support for democracy: On the interplay between an empirically-based research program and the effort to secure access to data 

The talk will stress that efforts to share data usually originate in the process of analyzing and trying to understand a particular problem. In the case of TRU, this has been monitoring the quality of democracy as a key factor deciding the future persistence of a democratic form of government. The talk will emphasize that to be valid the monitoring of the quality of democracy must be empirically based, necessitating access to relevant data. Access to such data will enable assessments of South African developments continentally via the Afrobarometer, and globally via the Varieties of Democracy Project (V-DEM), the World Values Survey and many others.

Dr H.C. Ekkehard Mochmann, former Director: German Social Science Infrastructure Services (GESIS).

Title of presentation: The Dynamics of Sharing Research Data

The talk will stress the dynamics of sharing data for research. The presentation will sketch the history of sharing data and will give an overview of the data archive networks that have been developed globally. The talk will elaborate on the consideration for quality criteria as well as the issue of capacity building, including the virtue of data-labs for hands-on training. An assessment will be offered of currently existing global research infrastructures.

Background about the Centre

The Transformation Research Unit (TRU) at Stellenbosch conducts comparative mixed methods research on democracy and democratic developments in a cross-cultural (African, Asian, Middle-Eastern, Latin-American and European) perspective. Four consecutive projects have been completed since 2000, when the programme was first established. The countries of interest include five younger democracies (South Africa, South Korea, Turkey, Chile and Poland) and two control cases (Sweden and Germany). 

In the course of the research programme it has become increasingly apparent that the abundance of relevant data is poorly utilised most probably due the absence of a central point for the collection, interpretation, analyses and exchange of data for the comparative study of democracy. This observation gave rise to the idea of creating an open access data centre in the form of an Intelligent Node.

The aim of the Intelligent Node is not to become yet another archive competing with existing data repositories, but rather to develop research capacity by helping African researchers and postgraduate students locate relevant data needed for their projects on democracy in particular - and in the Social Sciences in general.

The Intelligent Node will assist them with searching global repositories of existing archive networks, thus utilising the vast amount of already existing data. Since access to data alone will not rectify the present state of affairs, a concurrent training programme will be developed in the scarce skills area of data analyses.

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Practical ways and options to manage wildlife in Africa

When: Friday, 04 May 2018 - Friday, 04 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Auditorium, Chalsty Teaching and Conference Centre, School of Law
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

 

institute@wits.ac.za / 011 717 8468

 

Godfrey Harris, President of Harris/Ragan Management Group, a Los Angeles-based public policy consulting firm, will present a public lecture.

The firm was founded in 1968. Harris has also been involved in the politics of ivory and serves as the Principal Political Representative of the International Ivory Society and Managing Director of the Ivory Education Institute. He is a member of the Advisory Board of the International Wildlife Management Consortium.

Harris holds degrees from Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles and has had multiple listings in Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World.

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Yebo Gogga Yebo amaBlomo 2018

When: Wednesday, 09 May 2018 - Sunday, 13 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Oppenheimer Life Sciences Building
Start time:8:30
Enquiries:

https://www.wits.ac.za/yebogogga/ 

cheryl@innercs.com

Deception- the act of making someone believe something that is not true.

This annual interactive exhibition of live plants and animals attracts schools, young and old nature enthusiasts and novices.

Hosted by the School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences and partners, the exhibition aims to develop an appreciation for nature and allows visitors to engage all their senses. The exhibition stands are manned by experts and practitioners keen to share the wonders of nature.

Deception is the theme of this year’s Yebo Gogga Yebo amaBlomo exhibition now 14th year.

Find out what’s in the I am not what you think I am and the Find me if you can exhibition stands.

Don’t miss the weekend talks which range from alternative food sources to dealing with scorpion stings and protecting breeding birds. Renowned wildlife videographer, Kim Wolhuter will share how he connects with animals to produce his award-winning work.

A detailed programme is available at https://www.wits.ac.za/yebogogga/ 

Free entrance. ALL are welcome.

Schools can book their visit to #YeboGogga by completing the form below.
*The form is strictly for school bookings. 

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The physiology of fossils

When: Friday, 04 May 2018 - Friday, 04 May 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Len Miller Lecture Theatre, 9th Floor, Wits Medical School
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

School of Physiology

How fossil bones can infer metabolic status of extinct dinosaurs and our human ancestors.

This lecture will be presented by Professor Roger Seymour, University of Adelaide, and will show that the physical size of skeletons and the holes in bones that pass blood vessels can indicate the rate of blood flow and hence the metabolic rates of the organs that they supply.

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Social justice and transformation: A curriculum for Africa

When: Friday, 04 May 2018 - Friday, 04 May 2018
Where:
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Wits School of Education

Panel discussion on transformation and decolonisation from the view African Indigenous knowledge.

The South African education system is undergoing fundamental change amid calls for decolonisation and transformation across the broad spectrum of society. But do we really know what these two terms entail? Join Mandaza Kandemwa, a traditional healer and inspirational speaker, and others, as they unpack and translate transformation and decolonisation from the point of view of African Indigenous knowledge.

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Africa Day 2018

When: Friday, 04 May 2018 - Friday, 04 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House Great Hall
Start time:9:00
Enquiries:

emmanuel.ojo@wits.ac.za 

Wits commemorates Africa Day 2018 early so that students and staff can participate in celebrating Africa's independence, freedom and liberation strife.

The Africa Day celebrations at Wits take place ahead of the annual May 25 activities which commemorate the establishment of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) on 25 May 1963. The OAU was later renamed the African Union.

This year's keynote address will be delivered by Professor Patrick Loch Otieno Lumumba, Kenyan scholar, pan-Africanist and advocate, on Friday, 4 May 2018, at 12:30. He will speak on the topic: Militarisation of democracy and democratic space: implication for higher education and engage in a panel discussion entitled, Revisiting militarisation of democracy and democratic space: implication for higher education at 14:00 with Wits academics Dr Dania Mupotsa and Dr  Samuel Ravengai.

The Wits celebrations will conclude with an African Classics and Jazz Concert at 19:30 in the Great Hall. Nomthandazo Mkhize Solomon, a well-known figure in the South African classical music scene, will lead performers in this tribute to Mother Africa. 

Programme

Africa Day programme of events

Africa Day 2018 Talks

Africa Day 2018 Concerts and Film Screening

 

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Launch of the new Wits Digitisation Centre

When: Friday, 11 May 2018 - Friday, 11 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
4th Floor, Wartenweiler Library
Start time:8:30
Enquiries:

Gabriele Mohale on +27 11 717-1940 or gabriele.mohale@wits.ac.za

Isaac Nkadimeng on +27 11 717-1940 or isaac.nkadimeng@wits.ac.za

The Centre will be actively involved in providing digital access to Wits' intellectual, social, economic and creative activities.

The Wits Digitisation Centre will also provide digital accses to the incredible cultural and scientific heritage at Wits, so as to boost research opportunities and support teaching and learning.

The new Wits Digitisation Centre.

The new Wits Digitisation Centre.

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Leveraging the housing asset through trade

When: Tuesday, 08 May 2018 - Tuesday, 08 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
1st Floor Seminar Room, John Moffat Building
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

njogu.morgan2@wits.ac.za 

The next Faces of the City seminar will be presented by Kecia Rust from the Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa.

A fundamental principle of the housing asset is the ability to use it for trade - homeowners buy and sell property, investing their income and realizing equity while they address their changing housing needs over time. In this way, housing is much more than simply shelter. It is also a critical component of household wealth, and a focus of most households’ savings. South Africa has a vibrant residential property market, which in the past 23 years has developed to serve a growing proportion of our population. Although affordable properties comprise a substantial proportion of the residential property market, the incidence of informal sales, or the backlog in the transfer of government subsidized stock has meant that in some cases, the integrity of the title deed may have been compromised. While the extent of informal market transactions is, by nature, difficult to estimate, they are thought to be significant. The Centre for Affordable Housing Finance in Africa is in the process of setting up a Transaction Support Centre to facilitate the resale of houses in Khayelitsha, Cape Town. Rust will present on some of the transaction stories emerging from the establishment of the centre and some of the strategies used to address backlogs in the transaction process.

 

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The social question in South Africa: From settler colonialism to neoliberal-era democracy

When: Tuesday, 22 May 2018 - Tuesday, 22 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Social Sciences Seminar Room, RS248, Robert Sobukwe Block
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

David.Francis@wits.ac.za

The Southern Centre for Inequality Studies will host Dr Ben Scully to present this seminar.

This talk draws on a chapter in a forthcoming volume on The Global Social Question. The chapter presents a history of the "social question" in South Africa, from the late-19th century to the present. The talk will focus on the post-Apartheid period. This is a period in which the dominance of neoliberal ideology has contradicted with a political and ideological imperative to expand access to social welfare for the previously excluded black majority, leading to a new, neoliberal-era response to the social question. While state-provided social protection has become increasingly important, gaps in the state's response, combined with failures in the labour market, have put pressure on households and other social connections, which highlight the continued relevance of the social question today.

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Social dialogue nordic style: Is it relevant for Ramaphosa´s South Africa?

When: Wednesday, 09 May 2018 - Wednesday, 09 May 2018
Where: Parktown Management Campus
Classroom E, Donald Gordon Building, Wits School of Governance
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

Lerato.Mooya@wits.ac.za

Liv Tørres, Adjunct Professor at the Wits School of Governance and the Executive Director of the Nobel Peace Centre in Oslo, will present this seminar.

Social dialogue has developed furthest in the Nordic countries and is closely associated with the strength of the labour market partners and of the collective bargaining system. Consensus about the aim to build consensus is not enough to realise actual social dialogue. One also needs to respect each other, see the value of building each other’s strength and recognise that good decisions are sometimes or often built on all parties both giving and taking.

 

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World Inequality Report Discussion

When: Thursday, 10 May 2018 - Thursday, 10 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Chalsty Seminar Room, School of Law
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

David.Francis@wits.ac.za 

The Southern Centre for Inequality Studies (SCIS) will host a discussion on the World Inequality Report.

Join the SCIS for a discussion and analysis about what the report, Overcoming Poverty and Inequality in South Africa: an assessment of drivers, constraints and opportunities can really tell us about the reproduction of inequality in South Africa. Dr Precious Zikhali, Poverty Economist at the World Bank and Professor Pundy Pillay from the Wits School of Governance will be part of the discussion.

For more than two decades, South Africa has sought to address poverty and inequality with a wide range of initiatives, including the use of fiscal policy to support redistributive measures. This report is an analysis of South Africa’s progress in reducing poverty and inequality since 1994, with 2006 to 2015 as a reference period. Its aim is to understand the dynamics of poverty and inequality in the country, to identify the drivers of progress for the purpose of further policy actions in this area.

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MyBucks loan scoring model : Real time credit decision as a machine learning classification problem

When: Thursday, 10 May 2018 - Thursday, 10 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
The Liberty Actuarial Auditorium Room 112, 1st floor, Mathematical Sciences Laboratory Building
Start time:12:30
Enquiries:

Edith.Mkhabela@wits.ac.za or 011 717-6272

Christiaan Hattingh from MyBucks will present this mathematical statistics seminar.

Hattingh will talk about the MyBucks loan scoring engine Jessie, which is a real-time binary classifier allowing for automated credit approval of customers, running as a service in a production environment. In this talk Hattingh will discuss the underlying classifier algorithm, training and validation, and challenges regarding the real-time implementation.

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Utopian Cosmos: First year architecture project exhibition

When: Friday, 18 May 2018 - Friday, 18 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Foyer of John Moffat Building
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

ariane.jansevanrensburg@wits.ac.za

The Wits School of Architecture and Planning will host this exhibition.

At the Wits School of Architecture and Planning recent cross disciplinary studies have revealed parallels between African indigenous knowledge systems (storytelling, myth and ritual) and the philosophy of embodied knowing. These discoveries have led to the development of a first year architecture design brief that attempts to explore and exploit the opportunities for an architecture of world making. In the Utopian Cosmos project, students used lived experience, embodiment and narrative (film and storytelling) as ways of engaging the subject and subjectivity of world making through architecture. Students were briefed in groups to create a community in which they develop social orders, rituals, cultures and values. From this they developed a cosmogenesis narrative for their community, a story of their beginnings and designed a place where this story can be told, modeled it and presented the narrative as a short animation. This was followed by a full size re-interpretation of their ritual space as a stage set for a performance at the Wits Amphitheatre.This project is a response to the underlying limitations of the objectivist paradigm to deal with the subjectivity of humanity and a changing  world, and in this way responds to the call for a decolonised curriculum at institutions of higher learning.

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Decisional capacity amongst minors: Balancing autonomy and protection in HIV research and treatment

When: Friday, 08 June 2018 - Friday, 08 June 2018
Where: Parktown Education Campus
School of Public Health Auditorium
Start time:12:00
Enquiries:

Rechelle.Tsunke@wits.ac.za / 011 717-1193

The Faculty of Health Sciences, Perinatal HIV Research Unit will host Dr Tiffany Chenneville from the University of South Florida to present this lecture.

Dr Chenneville will describe the relevant ethical, legal, and practical implications associated with decisional capacity when treating or conducting research with minors, provide a framework for assessing the decisional capacity of minors in clinical and research settings; and present a model for balancing the autonomy rights of minors with their need for protection using information about decisional capacity. The importance of using this model in HIV research and treatment involving minors will be emphasised.

Chennevile is a Fulbright Specialist, Associate Professor and the Graduate Program Director in the Psychology Department at the University of South Florida.

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Voices of moral authority: Parents, paediatricians and what will actually help

When: Monday, 04 June 2018 - Monday, 04 June 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Marie Curie Lecture Theatre
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Samkelo.Nsibande@wits.ac.za

The Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics will host Professor Richard Hain, a consultant and clinical lead in Paediatric Palliative in Wales to present this lecture.

A number of recent high profile cases globally have highlighted two strong but contradictory views of who should make decisions about medical treatment at the end of a child’s life. Some believe it is self-evidently the right of parents. Others consider the responsibility to be entirely that of the expert doctors. This talk will explore the origins of moral authority in decision making over children.

 

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Eko for show!: Postfeminist spectacular meets Lagos

When: Wednesday, 23 May 2018 - Wednesday, 23 May 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Seminar Room, Humanities Graduate Centre, Southwest Engineering Building
Start time:13:15
Enquiries:

Katlego.Disemelo@wits.ac.za / 011 717-7914

The Wits Media Studies Department will host this lunchtime research seminar with Dr Simidele Dosekun from University of Sussex.

'Eko for show' is a rhyming Nigerian expression that brands the city of Lagos - 'Eko,' in Yoruba -  a showy and flamboyant place, its citizens given to spectacle, over-invested in appearances, competitively seeking to impress and indeed 'oppress' through visual and material display. This talk maps and surfaces the city in the postfeminist self-fashioning and self-representation of a set of elite Lagos women, showing how, including in its cosmopolitanism, a new transnational style of femininity makes particular local - Lagosian - sense. Dosekun is a lecturer in media and cultural studies at the University of Sussex. Her forthcoming monograph is on the fashioning of postfeminist subjectivities in Lagos. 

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Exhibition: Origins of Sapiens Behaviour

When: Thursday, 10 May 2018 - Friday, 31 August 2018
Where: Off campus
Spier Wine Farm, R310 Baden Powell Drive, Stellenbosch, 7603
Start time:9:00
Enquiries:

Petro.Keene@wits.ac.za

RSVP:

Petro.Keene@wits.ac.za

The Wits Evolutionary Studies Institute and University of Bergen's SFF Centre for Early Sapiens Behaviour have collaborated on "Origins of Sapiens Behaviour".

The Evolutionary Studies Institute at Wits in collaboration with the SFF Centre for Early Sapiens Behaviour (SapienCE) at the University of Bergen, Norway, have developed an installation of an exhibition, Origins of Early Sapiens Behaviour.

Curated by Petro Keene, Craig Foster and Jos Thorne, the exhibition is on from 10 May to 31 August 2018 at the Spier Wine Farm, Stellenbosch, Western Cape, South Africa.

It is part of a broader museum exhibition and education programme to be established at the De Hoop Nature Reserve in 2019. 

Origins of Early Sapiens Behaviour showcases 25 years of archaeological research in the southern Cape, undertaken by Professor Christopher Henshilwood and Dr Karen van Niekerk and their research team at Blombos Cave and Klipdrift Shelter.

Henshilwood is Distinguished Professor and South African NRF SARChI Chair in Modern Human Origins at the ESI at Wits. He is also director of a Research Council of Norway funded 10 year Centre of Excellence, the Centre for Early Sapiens Behaviour (SapienCE) at the University of Bergen, Norway.

 Origins of Sapiens Behaviour is an exhibition at Spier Wine Farm, Stellenbosch

Displays of the Origins of Early Sapiens Behaviour have been designed to explore key aspects of archaeological research linked to our human origins and innovations and they illustrate the rich archaeological record of the southern coast of South Africa. 

Themes focus on and explore the concept of ‘we are all one’. This enables the viewer to engage with the knowledge that Homo sapiens originated from the continent of Africa and promotes an understanding of our common ancestry. 

Daily life of Homo sapiens captured on film

Artefacts have been finely replicated and displayed to highlight the fascinating discoveries from the Blombos Cave and the Klipdrift Shelter sites. These comprise 16 display panels including four videos by the filmmaker, Craig Foster.

The videos illustrate the remarkable scientific work of archaeologists and recreate scenes of the daily activities of our early human ancestors, Homo sapiens, who lived in caves along the southern coast of South Africa over 160 000 years ago.

One of the many exciting finds presented is a 100 000-year-old ochre-processing toolkit from Blombos Cave. This find is evidence of the manufacture of red ochre-rich paint that was mixed and stored in the first known containers, abalone shells. The people living in the cave made beads out of tiny estuarine shells, engraved abstract designs on ochre and created intricate stone and bone points.

In the De Hoop Nature Reserve at Klipdrift Shelter, more than 100 deliberately engraved ostrich eggshell fragments were recovered in layers that date from 65 000 to 59 000 years ago. These artefacts provide evidence for early complex behaviour and the capacity for symbolic thought.

Origins of Early Sapiens Behavior showcases replicated engraved eggshell fragments and engraved ostrich egg water flasks as well as replicas of finely crafted stone tools. These are among the earliest remnants of hunting tools and evidence of a highly sophisticated and technologically minded people.

Current genetic evidence and a ‘people’s history’ is portrayed at the Origins of Early Sapiens Behaviour exhibition to educate learners and visitors about their past and instil a sense of pride in our common African origins. Thus, the experience of learning about our early ancestors is enhanced by the ‘power of place’ – by being situated within the very area in which they once thrived.

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The student view of the PhD process

When: Wednesday, 06 June 2018 - Wednesday, 06 June 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Staff Lounge, Bohlaleng Block
Start time:13:00
Enquiries:

Lerato.Sekhibane@wits.ac.za / 011 717-3409

Steve Lerman, Emeritus Professor in Mathematics Education at London South Bank University will present this seminar.

This seminar will consider the experience of studying for a PhD from the student’s perspective, and how this enables supervisors to strengthen their supervision skills.

In this session, Lerman will use a recently published newspaper piece by a PhD student, called “10 Truths” to look at the experience of studying for a PhD from the student’s perspective. The short article will be circulated in advance. 

There is a short article for pre-reading – be sure to request it in advance. 

 

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Women’s health rights seminar

When: Tuesday, 29 May 2018 - Tuesday, 29 May 2018
Where: Parktown Health Sciences Campus
Marie Currie Lecture Theatre
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

Thato.Chauke@wits.ac.za

The Faculty of Health Sciences will host this Women’s Health Rights Seminar to commemorate the Albertina Sisulu centenary celebrations.

Speakers include Dr Lawrence Chauke, Assistant Head of School ( Cluster C), Clinical Medicine, Dr Salome Maswime (Obstetrician and Gynacologist), Professor Dame Tina Lavender from Manchester University UK and Ntsiki Sisulu-Singapi, Albertina Sisulu’s granddaughter. The panel will discuss topics on maternal deaths, respectful maternal care, cervical and breast cancer.

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Just City Dialogues

When: Friday, 01 June 2018 - Friday, 01 June 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
East Room, Wits Club
Start time:15:00
Enquiries:

Info.Cityinstitute@wits.ac.za

The Wits City Institute will host this roundtable in association with the African Centre for the Study of the United States at Wits.

The Just City Dialogues features Professor Toni Griffin (Harvard Graduate School of Design) in conversation with Dr Mpho Matsipa and Noëleen Murray (both Wits City Institute) and will be chaired by Professor Gilbert Khadiagala (African Centre for the Study of the United States, Wits University).

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Colloquium on ‘land and property in a contested terrain’

When: Monday, 02 July 2018 - Monday, 02 July 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus West
Chalsty Centre
Start time:8:30
Enquiries:

LeeAnne.Bruce@wits.ac.za 

The South African Journal on Human Rights and the Centre for Applied Legal Studies at Wits will host this colloquium on land and property.

Panel discussions will include a wide range of topics from different disciplines including law and sociology. The main colloquium will be followed immediately by a facilitated conversation with Advocate Tembeka Ngcukaitobi, author of The Land is Ours and Stha Yeni, national co-ordinator of Tshintsha Amakhaya as well as a cocktail reception.

 

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Africa-China Wildlife Conservation Conference

When: Thursday, 07 June 2018 - Thursday, 07 June 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:14:00
Enquiries:

ACRPcontact@gmail.com

RSVP:

ACRPcontact@gmail.com

This conference will focus on wildlife conservation and environmental preservation.

On 7 June 2018 the Africa-China Reporting Project and partners Global Max Media Group, China Biodiversity Conservation and Green Development Foundation, Nature Guardian Wildlife Conservation Centre and China House have the honour to welcome H.E. Lin Songtian, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the People’s Republic of China to the Republic of South Africa, to convene with wildlife conservation leaders and Chinese community leaders for the Africa-China Wildlife Conservation Conference at Wits University. Wildlife conservation leaders, social advocates and media professionals are all warmly invited to attend.

This event will focus on wildlife conservation and environmental preservation, aiming to build a platform for deeper dialogue and intervention between Chinese communities in Africa and wildlife conservation organisations.

With cooperation we can work together to resolve issues of habitat loss, human-wildlife conflicts, poaching and the illegal wildlife trade and help draw greater contributions to wildlife conservation in Africa. The conference will provide opportunities for the donation of supplements and materials for wildlife parks/conservancies across South Africa, and will address an urgent need for those in the conservation field who want to express their concerns or good intentions to reach out to Chinese communities.

The conference will address the following issues:

  • What kind of animals and plants need to be protected in Africa? What are the biggest problems in the field of wildlife conservation in Africa?
  • What can the Chinese communities do to improve wildlife conservation in Africa through Africa-China cooperation?
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Organise or die? Democracy and leadership in South Africa’s National Union of Mineworkers

When: Tuesday, 05 June 2018 - Tuesday, 05 June 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Seminar Room, Humanities Graduate Centre, South West Engineering Building
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

info.witspress@wits.ac.za

Wits University Press and the SWOP will launch the book, Organise or die? Democracy and leadership in South Africa’s National Union of Mineworkers.

The launch will include a panel discussion with Raphaël Botiveau, author of the book; Piet Matosa, National Union of Mineworkers president, Crispen Chinguno, Sol Plaatje University and Gavin Capps, Society, Work and Development Institute (SWOP). They will talk on the changing relationship between the Union leadership
and the Union’s members.

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What is the position of educational research in the relations between the stakeholders in education?

When: Tuesday, 05 June 2018 - Tuesday, 05 June 2018
Where: Parktown Education Campus
Staff Lounge, Bohlaleng Block
Start time:16:00
Enquiries:

Lerato.Sekhibane@wits.ac.za or call 011 717-3409

Stephen Lerman, Emeritus Professor of Mathematics Education, London South Bank University, will present this lecture.

The influences on governments for policy changes in schools range across many agencies, including the political party in power. When policies change, the sources of these influences are not always clear. In this lecture, Lerman will explore the sources and nature of those influences. He will identify the agents and agencies involved in educational activity as we examine the most recent changes in England and South Africa.

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Sembene across Africa: A celebration across the continent in 28 countries

When: Saturday, 09 June 2018 - Sunday, 10 June 2018
Where: Off campus
Soweto Theatre, cnr. Bolani Rd and Bolani Link, Jabulani (9 June 2018); Market Theatre Photo Workshop Auditorium, 138 Lillian Ngoyi Street, Newtown ( 10 June 2018)
Start time:14:30
Enquiries:

010 446-1462 (Soweto Theatre)  and windybrow@markettheatre.co.za (Market Theatre Photo Workshop Auditorium)

RSVP:

010 446-1462 (Soweto Theatre)  and windybrow@markettheatre.co.za (Market Theatre Photo Workshop Auditorium)

The Galle Ceddo Projects in association with the Sembene Estate, the Wits School of Arts Film & TV Division and others will host this film screening.

Ousmane Sembene, son of a Senegalese fisherman, was kicked out of school. After working as a manual labourer for 15 years, Sembene became a novelist and filmmaker. Sembene dedicated his every moment to galvanizing and inspiring people, creating visionary, profound and subversive stories.

Sembene’s classic 1975 XALA, is one of the great works of political cinema, plus the award-winning documentary SEMBENE!. Sembene’s masterful satire follows a group of African leaders who pledge a new, equitable society, and then immediately follow the path of the money-grabbing, corrupt French businessmen who fleeced the country for decades. One of the African leaders celebrates his growing bank account with an elaborate wedding for his third wife (a teenager) but on the day of the wedding finds he's been hit with a curse, or xala, rendering him impotent. His path towards discovering the source of the curse echoes the nation’s arc of corruption and, perhaps someday, redemption.

SEMBENE! tells the unbelievable true story of the self-taught “father of African cinema,” who fought enormous odds to return African stories to Africa. SEMBENE! uses rare archival footage and more than 100 hours of exclusive materials to craft a true-life epic, as an ordinary man transforms himself into a fearless spokesperson for the marginalised. 

This film screening is hosted by Galle Ceddo Projects in association with the Sembene Estate, the Wits School of Arts Film & TV Division, the Wits History Workshop and Reframing Africa.

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Remembering Martin Luther King,Jr: 50 years later

When: Friday, 22 June 2018 - Friday, 22 June 2018
Where: Off campus
IPATC Offices, 5 Molesey Avenue, Auckland Park 2092, Johannesburg
Start time:14:30
Enquiries:

Dr Dawn Nagar at dawnn@uj.ac.za or Ms. Cecilia Nedziwe-Moyo, cmoyo@uj.ac.za; or Ms. Hope Hadebe, at ghhadebe@uj.ac.za; or 011 559-7230

 

RSVP:

Dr Dawn Nagar at dawnn@uj.ac.za or Ms. Cecilia Nedziwe-Moyo, cmoyo@uj.ac.za; or Ms. Hope Hadebe, at ghhadebe@uj.ac.za; or 011 559-7230

 

A documentary screening in remembrance of Dr Martin Luther King.

The University of Johannesburg’s Institute for Pan-African Thought and Conversation (IPATC), in collaboration with the Wits African Centre for the Study of the United States (ACSUS), will host the screening of a documentary in remembrance of  Dr Martin Luther King, Jr.

Professor Adekeye Adebajo, Director, IPATC, and Professor Gilbert Khadiagala, Director, ACSUS, will lead a discussion after the screening of the documentary. Written and directed by Thomas Friedman, Dr Martin Luther King, Jr: A Historical Perspective offers a one-of-a-kind examination of King’s extraordinary life. Using rare and largely unseen footage and photographs, Friedman explores how King’s ideas, beliefs and methods evolved in the face of the rapidly changing climate of the Civil Rights Movement.

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DFL-NTNU Symposium

When: Thursday, 14 June 2018 - Thursday, 14 June 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Emakhaya Theatre, 19th Floor, University Corner Building, Corner Jorissen and Jan Smuts, Braamfontein
Start time:9:30
Enquiries:

Caryn.Green@wits.ac.za / 011 717-4615 (Symposium)

Petro.JanseVanVuuren@wits.ac.za / 011 717-4731 (Democracy through Theatre partnership project)

Drama for Life (DFL) and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) will host this symposium.

This second DFL-NTNU Symposium will offer a critical moment for delegates to engage with cutting-edge theorising and definitions, based on Drama for Life’s praxis in the discipline of Applied Drama and Theatre Studies.

 Within the current post-democracy context, questions about the role of education, media, and the arts and culture have become burning issues. Applied Drama and Theatre praxis has historically held the mantle of an informed and engaged approach to social change, particularly within the South African context. The post-truth era has seen a rise in populism, nationalism and violence. This, coupled with on-going psycho-social trauma in the post-war context of South Africa, has challenged the assumption that Applied Drama and Theatre is ‘naturally’ a liberatory force.  It is timely that we engage in a rigorous dialogue about Applied Drama and Theatre Studies and praxis from a theoretical, methodological and systemic point of view. It is a space begging for engagement. There is an urgent need to foster a training that is rooted in a human rights and social justice discourse, supported by people-centred arts-based approaches, and enhanced by partnerships that build meaningful relationships between academic, public and community arts spaces. The DFL-NTNU Symposium offers an opportunity for us to create a platform to begin this process.

Teachers, artists, students and researchers of Applied Drama and Theatre, who care about our societies and our human conditions, are invited to attend this 1-day symposium focused on the following questions:

  • How can we effectively use the arts, without compromising its aesthetic power, to bring about meaningful, sustainable social transformation and healing in post-democratic and post-war contexts?
  • What role can Applied Drama and Theatre play in seeking political inclusion that invites a variety of viewpoints especially the stories of the unheard and unseen?
  • What are community arts practitioners doing to develop multimodal aesthetic understandings in the context of democratic agency?
  • What role can cultural leadership play in fostering effective, ethical and sustainable Applied Drama and Theatre projects?
  • How can we leverage university-society collaboration and strengthen existing relationships between academic partners and Applied Drama and Theatre partners in the field?
  • How can we together learn to be resilient in our Applied Drama and Theatre praxis, without compromising our humanity, as we engage with the enormous challenges of change in the 21st century?

This 2nd symposium forms part of the 'Democracy through Theatre' partnership project between Drama for Life, based at the University of Witwatersrand’s School of Arts, and the Department of Arts and Media Studies at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The project aims to strengthen applied drama and theatre collaborative projects, applied theatre postgraduate education and research through course development, and student and teacher exchange by jointly addressing a thematic focus of investigation: contemporary and crucial issues of global democracy with specific reference to Norway and South Africa. The 1st NTNU-DFL symposium was staged in Norway in November, 2017.

For the full programme, please follow this link DFL_NTNU Symposium Programme

Registration Fee:

Private Practitioners/Corporates: R300
Wits Staff/NGOs: R150

Students: Free (on presentation of a valid student card)

No card payments will be accepted at the venue. Please send an email if an invoice is required for EFT or cash payments.

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Decolonisation:Speaking uncomfortable truths to your “own” side and to the “other” side

When: Thursday, 14 June 2018 - Thursday, 14 June 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

 

Michelle.Gallant@wits.ac.za

 

 

William Gumede, Associate Professor in the Wits School of Governance will deliver the 2018 Nadine Gordimer Lecture.

He is the Chairperson of the Democracy Works Foundation. During the apartheid era, he held leadership positions in student, trade union, and civic movements. Gumede is the author of South Africa in BRICS: Salvation or Ruination? and Restless Nation: Making Sense of Troubled Times. He also published the award winning and acclaimed children’s book, A Kite’s Flight.

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Mysteries from the grave: The forensic aspects of identification

When: Tuesday, 19 June 2018 - Tuesday, 19 June 2018
Where: Parktown Education Campus
School of Public Health Auditorium
Start time:17:30
Enquiries:

Antonia.Appel@wits.ac.za  / 011 717-2001

The Wits Faculty of Health Sciences hosts the 17th Prestigious Research Lecture to be delivered by Professor Maryna Steyn and Dr Candice Hansmeyer.

This lecture will highlight the dilemma of human identification in a forensic setting, with particular focus on the vast numbers of unidentified decedents and missing persons in South Africa. Professor Steyn is Head of the School of Anatomical Sciences at Wits University and Dr Hansmeyer is a forensic pathologist at Wits.

 

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South Africa in Africa: The importance of (re-) adopting a Pan-African mindset in business

When: Tuesday, 26 June 2018 - Tuesday, 26 June 2018
Where: Parktown Management Campus
Donald Gordon Auditorium, Wits Business School
Start time:18:00
Enquiries:

 thembeka.hlatshwayo@wits.ac.za 

The Wits Business School will host this panel discussion on Pan-Africanism.

Pan-Africanism is an age-old concept that has seen has generations of African leaders determined to forge solidarity among African states. The African Union’s Agenda 2063 (“The Africa We Want”) recommits to a prosperous and politically united continent based on sustainable development and inclusive growth.

From the ground-breaking ideals of Ghanian revolutionary Kwame Nkrumah to the “African Renaissance” immortalised by former President Thabo Mbeki to the ideals of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), what has happened to Pan-Africanism in 2018?
 
Please join Visiting Adjunct Professor at Wits Business School Dr Reuel Khoza and a panel of speakers as they grapple with these questions:

  • From Nkuruma to Ramaphosa: what happened?
  • Whatever happened to the African Renaissance?
  • NEPAD: Stillborn, or morphed?

Panelists:

  • Lynette Chen, CEO: the NEPAD Business Foundation
  • Dr Somadoda Fikeni, Leading public commentator and political analyst
  • William Gumede, Associate Professor, Wits School of Governance 

Click here for speaker bios

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Jumping into the future

When: Thursday, 28 June 2018 - Thursday, 28 June 2018
Where: Braamfontein Campus East
Senate Room, 2nd Floor, Solomon Mahlangu House
Start time:17:30
Enquiries:

lbarnard@csir.co.za

The story of how Wits alumnus Matthew Whalley founded an innovative South African drone company.

Whalley, CEO of Passerine Aircraft Corporation, will be presenting a talk on his exciting journey starting a unique South African drone manufacturing company.

Since graduating from Wits University with BSc (Aeronautical Engineering) and MSc (Engineering) (2015) degrees, Whalley founded Passerine Aircraft. In this talk he will share how funding through Y Combinator - a new model for funding early stage startups – helped the company to lift off, and most importantly, how he and his team of aviation experts are using advances in control systems and lessons from nature to create a jumping aircraft.

The Passerine Aircraft drones’ design is unique, with legs that propel the design into the air-modelled off the flight of a bird.

Wits alumnus Matthew Whalley

Interview

Wits Associate Lecturer in Aeronautical Engineering, Jyotika Singh, spoke to the 27-year-old Whalley about his journey:

JS: Why did you choose Wits for both degrees?

MW: Both my parents went to Wits and it was the only university offering Aeronautical Engineering as an undergraduate degree.

JS: Who are the people that inspire you the most and why?

MW: Kelly Johnson and Burt Rutan for not following convention in design, and my dad for his approach to solving problems. I also have a huge amount of respect for Nelson Mandela and people who are doing more than earning a living and are making the world a better place.

JS: What are your favourite aircraft?

The Spitfire Mk-IIb and the YF-12 (weaponised SR-71 Blackbird).

JS: When did you start your company, Passerine Aircraft?

MW: In October 2017.

JS: How did you come up with the name “Passerine” Aircraft?

MW: From birds. Perching birds.

JS: Where did you find inspiration for your company?

MW: Initially from partaking in the Flying Donkey Challenge at Wits. I saw that there was a need for a drone that wasn’t too big and was able to carry cargo, be able to do missions and be as easy to use as a quadcopter.

JS: What is novel about your aircraft?

MW: It has legs, a blown wing, ducted fans, powered deep stall landing and it is designed to carry a large tailored payload fraction on a small planform.

JS: What was your proudest moment?

MW: Getting into Y Combinator.

JS: Where do you see the company in the next 5 years?

MW: We want to be selling three types of drones into Africa, Europe and America and make a multi-million dollar turnover.

JS: What is your advice to aspiring aeronautical engineers?

MW: You have to be passionate about aircraft and make sure that you read up about what has been done already.

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