UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND, JOHANNESBURG

Welcome to the Division of Science and Technology Education

Science & Technology Education

The Division of Science and Technology Education (DSTE) is part of the School of Education at the University of the Witwatersrand. The Division is a centre for excellence in Science and Technology teacher education and one of South Africa’s leaders in Science Education research. We offer a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses in the Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, Technology, Curriculum Studies, Pedagogics and Science Education. Within this range the DSTE offers a variety of subject areas and short courses to in-service and pre-service science teacher educators. At the undergraduate level we offer courses leading to qualifications as specialized secondary school Physical Science, or Life Science or Technology teachers. Our undergraduate courses are specially designed to produce highly competent educators of international standards, with excellent subject matter knowledge and exceptional pedagogical skills. Post graduate programmes include the Bachelor of Science Honours degree in Science Education (B.Sc. Ed), the Master of Science Education degree in Science Education (M.Sc.Ed), and research degrees by dissertation at the masters (M.Sc. Ed) level and by thesis at the doctoral (P.hD) level. Research in the DSTE is performed under the guidance of the Marang Centre for Research in Science and Mathematics Education, a research centre housed by both the DSTE and the Division of Mathematics Education. The strands of research include: indigenous knowledge (IK); nature of science and scientific inquiry; science teacher pedagogical content knowledge; language in science education; informal learning in science; and teacher development.  

Our Mission is to:

  • produce science and technology teacher educators who are marketable in the public and private education sectors of the economy
  • provide training of the highest quality and standard in science and technology education
  • provide quality research training to postgraduate students at Honours, Masters and P.hD levels
  • become the leading centre for science education research in Africa in terms of quality research outputs
  • keep our staff highly motivated and committed through incentives and rewards.

Science and Technology Education Courses

The Division of Science and Technology Education offers courses across the Undergraduate and Postgraduate Levels.

Bachelor of Education degree (Science)

In the four year Bachelor of Education (B.Ed) Science programme, we provide training to pre-service students who become secondary school teachers specialised in Physical Science or Life Science. Students wishing to join this programme must normally have passed Mathematics and Physical Science or Life Science at the Matriculation level. We offer the following science courses; Natural Science, Life Science and Physical Science. These courses run alongside courses focusing on developing pedagogical skills essential for teaching science at the secondary school level. This includes spending six weeks a year in schools on observation and/or teaching experience. 

All B.Ed students do a Natural Science course in the first year and a Natural Science course in their second year. These courses are introductory and cover topics in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Environmental Science. In the third year, the student can choose to either specialize in Physical Science or Life Science.  For all our courses, the teaching and learning is guided by commitments to understanding and practising scientific inquiry

Our B.Ed graduates are sought after by both public and private schools and we are very proud to produce highly marketable teachers. 

 

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Bachelor of Education degree (Technology)

In the four year Bachelor of Education (B.Ed) Engineering Technology  programme, we provide training to pre-service students who become  primary or secondary school teachers specialised in (GET) Technology or FET Technology. Students wishing to join this programme must normally have passed Mathematics and Engineering Graphics and Design at the Matriculation level. We offer the following engineering technology courses; Technology l, Technology ll, Mechanical Technology and Engineering Graphics and Design. These courses run alongside courses focusing on developing pedagogical skills essential for teaching engineering technology at the GET and FET levels. This includes spending six weeks a year in schools on observation and/or teaching experience. 

All B.Ed students do a Technology l course in the first year and a Technology ll course in their second year. These courses are introductory and cover topics in the Graphical Communication (including educational information technology); structures; mechanical and electrical systems; selected materials including food and the design process. In the third year, the student can choose to specialize in either Mechanical Technology or Engineering Graphics and Design. Throughout the programme students will be nurtured to be dynamic and creative in problem solvers. Students are empowered with both technical and soft skills essential for their profession. The goal is to produce highly competent students to meet the growing demands for information and engineering technologists.Post Graduate

 

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Certificate in Education PGCE

A postgraduate PGCE route into science teaching is available. Entry into science teaching and qualifying to teach Physical Science or Life Science to Matric level requires three years of either Physical Science or Life Science or relevant Science subjects. An applicant must have at least one Physical Science subject at second year level (e.g. two years of Chemistry and one year of Physics) or one Physical Science or Life Science course at third year level within their undergraduate degree.  Entry into science teaching and qualifying to teach Natural Science to Grade 9 level requires a pass in a Science subject at level 1 within students' undergraduate degrees.

 

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B. Sc. Ed. Honours programme in Science Education

This programme (offered in 1 year full time or two year part time modes) focuses on developing depth and breadth of Physical Science or Life Science subject content knowledge and sharpening pedagogical skills. The programme introduces students to postgraduate studies in science education and provides basic training in research, academic reading and writing. It also acculturates students into the field of science education. Courses covered in the programme include; Physical Sciences, Biological Sciences, Learning Theories, Introduction to the History, Philosophy and Nature of Science, Language and Communication in Science, Practical Work in Science, Teaching Environmental Science and Science Technology and Society.

Entry to the B.Sc.Ed Honours programme in Science Education requires an undergraduate degree with at least a first year B.Sc. or equivalent (B Ed with a secondary science specialism, or a 2 2 Diploma  ACE focused on secondary science), as well as a 60% pass in the Physical Sciences or Life Sciences or an appropriate science subject.

 

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M. Sc. Ed Science Education (by coursework or dissertation)

This programme (offered in 1 year full time or two year part time modes) focuses on educational aspects of one or more of the sciences (Physics, Chemistry, Biology). The programme aims to provide participants with a firm grounding in the key areas in science education. It focuses on instructive analyses of the psychological, sociological, philosophical, curriculum and pedagogical issues in contemporary science education. It confers: clear thinking, analytical, written and oral communication skills requisite for a science educator; provides an excellent theoretical and practical background for participation in science education research; and prepares participants for effective citizenship and participation in socio-economic transformation. The coursework option consists of a series of taught courses focused on a combination of:

  • Research Methods and Design in Science Education
  • The Learning and Teaching of Science
  • Subject Matter Knowledge for Teaching Science
  • Current Issues in Science Education
  • Science Education in Developing Countries
  • Conducting and writing up a research project in the field of Science Education. 

An M. Sc. Ed. by dissertation involves a significantly more substantive research project without the support of the taught courses. It is thus suitable for students with significant prior experience of academic reading and writing and awareness of key literature in the field of Science Education.

To qualify for entry into the M. Sc. Ed Science Education programme candidates must normally have: a Bachelor of Science Honours (or equivalent) majoring in one of the appropriate science subjects, plus a minimum of Bachelors degree or Equivalent Diploma in Education; and appropriate teaching experience. We normally require a minimum of an average mark of 60 % at the Honours degree and an average of 70% on a research project in the field. Candidates may be required to write a selection test.

 

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Ph D in Science education: research areas

We offer full and part-time options on the PhD in Science Education, with students attached to supervisors with expertise in the areas of focus within doctoral studies. Some research areas are:

  • Indigenous Knowledge Systems (Prof. Elaosi Vhurumuku and Dr. Emmanuel Mushayikwa) 
  • Subject matter knowledge for  teaching science ( Prof. Marissa Rollnick) 
  • Language and communication in science education (Dr. Samuel Oyoo) 
  • Informal Learning in Science (Dr. Anthony Lelliott) 
  • Nature of Science and Scientific inquiry (Prof. Elaosi Vhurumuku) 
  • Laboratory work in Science Education (Prof. Elaosi Vhurumuku and Prof. Marissa Rollnick)
  • Teacher Professional Development (Dr. Emmanuel Mushayikwa)

To qualify for entry into the PhD Science Education doctoral programme, candidates should normally hold a Masters degree in Science Education or other appropriate and relevant Masters degree with strong components in Science and Science Education related areas. Candidates may be interviewed as part of the selection process. 

Competitive full time doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships are available for suitably qualified and experienced researchers in the field of science education. More information on the entry requirements for our postgraduate courses is available from the Marang web page

 

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Staff

Wits School of Education, Science and Technology Education

Megan Doidge, Lecturer

Megan Doidge, Lecturer

Science and Technology Education


megan.doidge@wits.ac.za


27 (11) 717 3262


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Science and Technology Education

Tony Lelliott, Prof

Tony Lelliott, Prof

Science and Technology Education


tony.lelliott@wits.ac.za


27(11) 717 3260


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Associate Professor
Science and Technology Education

Elizabeth Mavhunga, Senior Lecturer

Elizabeth Mavhunga, Senior Lecturer

Science and Technology Education


elizabeth.mavhunga@wits.ac.za


0117171000


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Science and Technology Education

Grace Moletsane, Senior Tutor

Grace Moletsane, Senior Tutor

Science and Technology Education


grace.moletsane@wits.ac.za


27(11) 7173248


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Science and Technology Education

Audrey Msimanga, Senior Lecturer

Audrey Msimanga, Senior Lecturer

Science and Technology Education


audrey.msimanga@wits.ac.za


27 (0) 117173073


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Science and Technology Education

Emmanuel Mushayikwa, Senior Lecturer

Emmanuel Mushayikwa, Senior Lecturer

Science and Technology Education


emmanuel.mushayikwa@wits.ac.za


0117171000


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Head of Division
Science and Technology Education

Vasi Naiker, Mr

Vasi Naiker, Mr

Science and Technology Education


vasidevan.naiker@wits.ac.za


0117171000


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Lecturer
Science and Technology Education

Mpunki Nakedi, Lecturer

Mpunki Nakedi, Lecturer

Science and Technology Education


mpunki.nakedi@wits.ac.za


0117171000


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Science and Technology Education

Samuel Oyoo, Senior Lecturer

Samuel Oyoo, Senior Lecturer

Science and Technology Education


samuel.oyoo@wits.ac.za


0117171000


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Science and Technology Education

Marissa Rollnick, Professor

Marissa Rollnick, Professor

Science and Technology Education


marissa.rollnick@wits.ac.za


27(11) 7173265


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Chair Of Science Education
Science and Technology Education

Barbara Thorne, Principal Tutor

Barbara Thorne, Principal Tutor

Science and Technology Education


barbara.thorne@wits.ac.za


27(11) 717 3251


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Science and Technology Education

Elaosi Vhurumuku, Associate Professor

Elaosi Vhurumuku, Associate Professor

Science and Technology Education


elaosi.vhurumuku@wits.ac.za


27(11) 717 3246


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Science and Technology Education

 

 

Contact Details

For inquiries about the work of the Division contact:

Undergraduate Matters

Shalati Mabunda or Blossom Catling: (Undergraduate) Division
Administrative Assistant 

Tel: 27 11717 3378
E-mail: Shalati.Mabunda@wits.ac.za
Division of Science and Technology Education
Address: Marang Building, Private Bag 3
Wits 2050
South Africa

OR
Dr. Emmanuel Mushayikwa (Head of Division)
Tel: 27 11 717 3250
E-mail: Emmanuel.Mushayikwa@wits.ac.za

Postgraduate Matters

Minkie Nkwanyana: (Postgraduate) Division
Administrative Assistant 

Tel: 27 11717 3409
E-mail: Minkie.Nkwanyana@wits.ac.za
Division of Mathematics Education
Address: Private Bag 3
Wits 2050
South Africa

OR
Dr. Emmanuel Mushayikwa (Head of Division)
Tel: 27 11 717 3250
E-mail: Emmanuel.Mushayikwa@wits.ac.za 

 

Publications by Members of the DSTE

Here is a list of selected journal publications by members of the DSTE. Please refer to individual’s website to get a fuller list of individual member’s publications:

  • Carol Steinberg, Heather Barclay, Judith Inglis, Lucas Magongwa, S’mangele Mayisela, Dawn Snell, & Mpunki Nakedi. (2005) Accommodating Diversity: Supporting Learning in an in-service Teacher education Programme Offered by the University of the Witwatersrand. In Welch, T. & Reed, Y. (Eds.). Designing and Delivering Distance Education: Quality Criteria and Case Studies from South Africa. Johannesburg: NADEOSA
  • Dudu, W.T., & Vhurumuku, E. (2012). Exploring South African Grade 11 learners’ perceptions of classroom inquiry: validation of a research instrument. Science Education International, 23 (2), pp. 150-165.  Published online June 2012. 
  • Dudu, W.T., & Vhurumuku, E. (2012). Teachers’ Practices of Inquiry When Teaching Investigations: A Case Study. Journal of Science Teacher Education. Available online:  http://www.springerlink.com/content/d3367464l0875637/ 
  • Dudu, W., & Vhurumuku, E. (2011). Exploring Learners’ Understandings of the Nature of Scientific Inquiry (NOSI): The Validation of a Research Instrument. The International Journal of Learning, Volume 18, 2011, http://www.Learning-Journal.com, ISSN 1447-9494. 
  • Kahn, M., & Rollnick, M.S.(1993). Science Education in the New South Africa, Reflections and visions. International Journal of Science Education 15 :(3) 261-272, 1993.
  • Lelliott, A., Mwakapenda, W., Doidge, M., du Plessis, J., Mhlolo, M., Msimanga, A., Mundalamo, F., Nakedi M., & Bowie, L. (2009). Issues of Teaching & Learning in South Africa: a disjunction between curriculum policy and implementation. African Journal for Research in MST Education. 13(1) 47-63.
  • Lelliott, A., & Pendlebury, S. (2009). A Large Object with a Small Museum?: A Narrative Analysis of Tlotlo’s Experience of an Astronomy Science Center. Curator: the Museum Journal 52(3) 241-260.
  • Lelliott, A. (2009). Using Personal Meaning Mapping to gather data on school visits. In Vavoula, G., Pachler, N. & Kukulska-Hulme, A. (Eds) Research Methods in Mobile and Informal Learning. Peter Lang: Oxford 205-220. ISBN 978-3-03911-832-8.
  • Lelliott, A., Plantan, T., & Gaines, M. (2012). From South Florida to South Africa: A collaborative approach for making science sensible to learners in informal and formal settings. International Journal of Education. 4(4) 53-64. Online at http://www.macrothink.org/journal/index.php/ije/article/view/1788/2218
  • Mushayikwa, E., & Lubben, F. (2009) Self-directed professional development - hope for teachers working in deprived environments? Teaching and Teacher Education, 25(3)375-382.
  • Mushayikwa, E. (2003) Coping with isolation in disadvantaged communities: Reflections of some rural teachers in Bulawayo - a feasibility study. British Educational Research Association AGM, British Educational Research Association, University of Exeter, UK, British Educational Research Association, 214-219, Published
  • Mushayikwa, E., Mtetwa, D., Mukono, T., Ncube, K., Tambo, E. (1999) The Process of Institutionalising an in – service support system for Advanced level Science and Mathematics teachers in Zimbabwe, Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research, 11(3)226 – 238. 
  • Msimanga, A., & Lelliott, A. (2012). Making sense of science: Argumentation for meaning-making in a teacher-led whole class discussion. African Journal of Research in Mathematics Science and Technology Education, 16(2).
  • Nakedi, M. Taylor, D. Mundalamo, F. Rollnick, M. & Mokeleche, M. (2012). The story of a Physical Science curriculum: transformation or transmutation? African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education 16 (3), 273–288.
  • Nyamupangedengu, E., & Lelliott, A.  (2012). An exploration of learners’ use of worksheets during a museum visit. African Journal of Research in Mathematics Science and Technology Education, 16 (1) pp.82-99
  • Oyoo, S. O. (October 2012). Language in science classrooms: An analysis of physics teachers’ use of and beliefs about language. Research in Science Education, 42 (5), 849 – 873. DOI: 10.1007/s11165-011-9228-3. 
  • Oyoo, S. O. (August 2011). Language in Science Classrooms: An analysis of Kenyan Physics Teachers’ use of and Beliefs about Language. The East African Journal of Educational Research, 1 (1), 89-116.
  • Oyoo, S. O. (2010). Attracting More Girls to School Physics in Kenya: Findings in a ‘Distance’ Study. The International Journal of Learning, 17 (10), 1-21. 
  • Oyoo, S. O. (2010). Science Teacher Effectiveness as a Condition for Successful Science Education in Africa: a Focus on Kenya. The International Journal of Learning, 17 (9), 469-484. 
  • Oyoo, S. O., Adipo, D. O., Muteitsi, R. M., Malusi, B. M. and Bakari, I. (2010). Adults’ Understandings and Retention of Selected School Science Concepts: Implications for School Science Curriculum and Effective Classroom Practice, 17 (2), 1-10. 
  • Oyoo, S. O. (2009). Navigating the foreign language problem in African Science Classrooms. Isiphethu Solwazi:Unizulu International Journal of Education, 1 (2), 106 – 127.
  • Oyoo, S. O. (2007). Rethinking Proficiency in the Language of Instruction (English) as a Factor in the Difficulty of School Science. The International Journal of Learning, 14 (4), 231 – 242
  • Rollnick, M., Mundalamo, F. & Booth, S. (2012) Concept Maps as Expressions of Teachers’ Meaning Making while Beginning to Teach Semiconductors. Research in Science Education DOI: 10.1007/s11165-012-9314-1
  • Rollnick, M.S. & Rutherford, M. (1990). African Primary school teachers - What ideas do they hold on air and air pressure? International Journal of Science Education 12(1), 101-114, 1990.
  • Rollnick, M.S. & Rutherford, M. (1993). The use of a conceptual change model and mixed language strategy for eradicating misconceptions on air pressure. International Journal of Science Education 15(4), 363-394, 1993.
  • Rollnick, M., Adler, J., & Setati, M. (2009). The institutional location of research in Mathematics and Science Education in South Africa. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education.
  • Tambo, E. M. Z., Mukono, T. T., Mushayikwa, E., Chavunduka, K., & Mtetwa, D. J. K. (1999) Science In-service training in Zimbabwe - the successes and dilemmas during the first year of operation, Southern African Review of Education, 5, 33 - 45 
  • Venkat, H., Adler, J., Rollnick, M., Setati, M., & Vhurumuku, E. (2009). Mathematics and science education research, policy and practice in South Africa: what are the relationships? African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. Special Issue 1, pp 5-27. ISSN: 1028-8457 
  • Vhurumuku, E. (2011). High school chemistry students’ scientific epistemologies and perceptions of laboratory inquiry. Chemistry Education, Research and Practice, 2011, 12, 47–56, ISSN: 1765 1108. Available: http://alturl.com/asoe9
  • Vhurumuku, E. (2010). The impact of explicit instruction on undergraduate students’ understandings of the nature of science. African Journal of Research in MST Education, Volume 14 (1), 2010, pp. 99–111. ISSN: 1028-8457. Available: http://alturl.com/7r282.